Tag: writing

New Partnership with Haringey Unchained

We are absolutely delighted to be the 2017-18 University partner of the Haringey Unchained. Haringey Unchained is a collective of students aiming to showcase the creative talent of Haringey Sixth Form Centre in Tottenham, London.

This collective publishes a volume of creative writing every year. Below is their 2017 collection, in collaboration with the University of Warwick.

har-e1499187201698.jpg

The collection is a great read and was launched on June 22nd, at  the final show of the Haringey Unchained and We Move Creative Arts Festival. Poetry readings were combined with dance performances inspired by the poems in the collection. Industry experts in the audience enjoyed the show as much as we did.

To find more about the work of Haringey Unchained check their website: https://haringeyunchained.wordpress.com/

We are really looking forward to working with students and staff at Haringey Sixth Form College. Our Middlesex students at BA English will work with and mentor Haringey students in editing volume 3 of Haringey Unchained.

All submissions welcome!

Day schedule for Symposium on Close Reading

The full schedule for the day symposium on Close Reading, Codes and Interpretation is now confirmed:

MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

Room H116 (Hatchcroft building)

13 June 2017

0900 – 0930 Registration

0930 – 1015 PAUL COBLEY (Middlesex University)
‘The magic of codes: semiotics and close reading’
1015-1100 BARBARA BLEIMAN (English and Media Centre)
‘Close reading in Secondary English – practices, problems and solutions’

1100 – 1115 tea/coffee

1115 – 1200 ADRIAN PABLÉ (University of Hong Kong)
‘Interpretation, radical indeterminacy and close reading’
1200 – 1245 STEFAN PETO (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys)
‘Close reading at the chalk-face: strategies and observations in Key Stage 3’

1245 – 1345 Lunch & Launch of the undergraduate magazine Mesh

1345 – 1430 JON ORMAN (University of Hong Kong)
‘Thick description and/as close reading: some language-philosophical reflections’
1430 – 1515 BILLY CLARK (Middlesex University)
‘Pragmatic inference and reading processes’
1515 – 1600 MARCELLO GIOVANELLI (Aston University) and JESS MASON (Sheffield Hallam University)
‘Whose close reading?: emphasis, attention and cognition in the literature classroom’

1600 -1615 tea/coffee

1615 – 1700 ANDREA MACRAE (Oxford Brookes University)
‘Close reading as process and product’
1700 – 1745 LOUISA ENSTONE (Darrickwood School)
‘Is it time to stop pee-ing? A grassroots study into teaching reading and essay writing at Secondary’
1745 – 1800 JOHAN SIEBERS (Middlesex University)
‘Only the furthest distance would be closeness – semantic anarchism, close reading and academic practice’

1800 – 1900 Book launch: Critical Humanist Perspectives: The Integrational Turn in Philosophy of Language and Communication, edited by Adrian Pablé (Routledge, 2017).

For more information, and to register click here.

‘Close reading, codes and interpretation’ – booking open and line-up confirmed

ooking to our one-day symposium on ‘Close reading, codes and interpretation’, hosted by the Language & Communication is now open.

book message cloud shape Book here.

When? 9 am-7 pm, Tuesday 13th June 2017
Where?
Room H116, Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, London, NW4 4BT

In some reckonings, ‘close reading’ is now around 90 years old, having been inaugurated in I. A. Richards’ Principles of Literary Criticism (1926) and Practical Criticism (1929). The close reading of texts has become arguably the central activity of the humanities and close reading is carried out across different levels of education and through a number of disciplines. As its practitioners recognize, procedures of close reading can become ossified into routine practices of code identification rather than active interpretation.

This day symposium seeks to ask what ‘close reading’ is like now, how it is exercised in education in different contexts and how it might differ from or resemble ‘codes’ of reading. It features papers by teachers in Higher Education, Further Education and Secondary Education, including:

  • BARBARA BLEIMAN (English and Media Centre): ‘Close reading in Secondary English –  practices, problems and solutions’
  • BILLY CLARK (Middlesex University): ‘Pragmatic inference and reading processes’
  • PAUL COBLEY (Middlesex University): ‘The magic of codes: semiotics and close reading’
  • LOUISA ENSTONE (Darrickwood School): ‘Is it time to stop pee-ing? A grassroots study into teaching reading and essay writing at Secondary’
  • MARCELLO GIOVANELLI (Aston University) and JESS MASON (Sheffield Hallam University): ‘Whose close reading?: emphasis, attention and cognition in the literature classroom’
  • ANDREA MACRAE (Oxford Brookes University): ‘Close reading as process and product’
  • JON ORMAN (University of Hong Kong): ‘Thick description and/as close reading: some language-philosophical reflections’
  • ADRIAN PABLÉ (University of Hong Kong): ‘Interpretation, radical indeterminacy and close reading’
  • STEFAN PETO (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys): ‘Close reading at the chalk-face: strategies and observations in Key Stage 3’
  • JOHAN SIEBERS (Middlesex University): ‘Only the furthest distance would be closeness – semantic anarchism, close reading and academic practice’what-reading

Cost: £10 flat fee (includes lunch and refreshments)

For the full day schedule, click here.

For any questions, please email Billy Clark b.clark@mdx.ac.uk or Paul Cobley p.cobley@mdx.ac.uk

Close reading, codes and interpretation: Speakers and room confirmed

Our Language & Communication research cluster warmly invites you the one-day symposium on ‘Close reading, codes and interpretation’. Room number and speakers have now been confirmed

When? 9 am-7 pm, Tuesday 13th June 2017

Where? Room H116, Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, London, NW4 4BTmdxIn some reckonings, ‘close reading’ is now around 90 years old, having been inaugurated in I. A. Richards’ Principles of Literary Criticism (1926) and Practical Criticism (1929). The close reading of texts has become arguably the central activity of the humanities and close reading is carried out across different levels of education and through a number of disciplines. As its practitioners recognize, procedures of close reading can become ossified into routine practices of code identification rather than active interpretation.

This day symposium seeks to ask what ‘close reading’ is like now, how it is exercised in education in different contexts and how it might differ from or resemble ‘codes’ of reading. It features talks by experts in education, including school teachers and university academics. Our speakers are:

  • Barbara Bleiman (English and Media Centre)
  • Billy Clark (Middlesex University)
  • Paul Cobley (Middlesex University)
  • Louisa Enstone (Darrick Wood School)
  • Marcello Giovanelli (Aston University) and Jess Mason (Sheffield Hallam University)
  • Andrea Macrae (Oxford Brookes University)
  • Jon Orman (University of Hong Kong)
  • Adrian Pablé (University of Hong Kong)
  • Stefan Peto (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys)
  • Johan Siebers (Middlesex University)

Cost: £10 flat fee (includes lunch and refreshments).

Registration opens soon.

For further details in the meantime, please email Paul Cobley p.cobley@mdx.ac.uk

Last date to register for free teachers conference

illc_2016_speakers_mosaic

Our free conference for English teachers (mentioned in our previous post) is just under three weeks away. The last date to register is next Monday, 31st October.

This will be a really fun and useful event. Teachers always respond positively to the opportunity to step outside the classroom to exchange ideas,  to hear about current research, and to consider how to apply some of these ideas in class. Some of the sessions will focus on developing specific resources and activities for class.

This year, the conference takes place the day before the NATE (National Association for the Teaching of English) post-16 conference, New Directions in Post-16 English, which is also being hosted at Middlesex.

If you can spare two days, why not come to both? If you’re already coming to one, maybe you could take an extra day to attend the other event.

You can find out more and book for the Integrating English conference here:

Fourth Integrating English Conference for Teachers

and for New Directions in Post-16 English here:

New Directions in Post-16 English

There is also a blog for the Post-16 conference here:

Post-16 conference blog

Hope some more teachers out there can join us.

Contact me if you have any questions about this.

Thinking About English

ba-english-middlesex

Our BA English programme at Middlesex takes a broad and inclusive view of English, encompassing all of the very wide range of activities which have been thoughts of as part of the subject and not assuming sharp boundaries within or at the edge of English.

There are several different things which helped to encourage us in this direction. For me, it began in discussion with students who seemed more open to this inclusive approach. Some of them approached me and asked why our programme didn’t seem to have much ‘lang-lit’ work (‘like we did at school’).

Thinking about this led to work exploring the current situation at school and at university with Andrea Macrae and Marcello Giovanelli. We worked on two research projects funded by the Higher Education Academy. These involved discussion with staff and students at schools and in universities, a workshop at Middlesex exploring these topics, and we produced two reports based on this (available via the Integrating English site).

Andrea, Marcello and I then set up the Integrating English project, which aims to promote this broad, inclusive view of English, and to help teachers and students at school by providing access to research ideas and other resources. We organise conferences for teachers (the fourth conference takes place at Middlesex on the 11th of November, the day before we host the National Association for the Teaching of English post-16 conference). We also run a website for the AQA awarding body called The Definite Article, where we publish digests of research papers and other resources.

This academic year is a very exciting one for us as we have launched our new degree which reflects this thinking about English. It’s very early to judge things but we have had a great time working with our new students so far and we’re looking forward to exploring ideas about English with them.

We’ll post more thoughts and resources on our thinking about English here, including some from events where we discuss this (Andrea, Marcello and I have been invited to give three presentations on our view of English this year). To start with, here are the slides from the presentation I gave at the Futures for English Studies seminar at the Open University in September:

Billy’s presentation at Futures for English Studies, Open University, September 2016

We’d love to carry on the discussion here so please comment or get in touch if you’d like to join in.

 

 

 

Marlowe, Shakespeare, Authors and Speech Recognition

marlowe_wee

The news that Marlowe is to be credited as a co-author for some of Shakespeare’s plays is big news, of course. It’s fascinating to think about how long debates have been going on about authorship of Shakespeare’s and other plays (e.g. Arden of Faversham, which is now being credited partly to Shakespeare). It seems we really do care about who produced the plays and not just about the plays themselves, even though there are, of course, lots of different views about the relative importance of texts, authors, contexts, readers, etc.

I’m also a bit amazed that linguistic evidence has been used to determine this, as there was a time when it seemed to be largely overlooked, despite what looked to me like some fairly clear evidence it provided, e.g. in the work of Jonathan Hope

Meanwhile, linguists are most excited about the news that an automated speech recognition system has achieved parity with human transcribers. I find this far more amazing. I remember John Wells explaining some of the difficulties which made it seem very unlikely that machines could ever come close to humans in this. It is amazing that they can now perform so well. Here’s Geoff Pullum commenting on it in response to the Language Log post:

geoffpullum_comment

I think my favourite speculation on who wrote Shakespeare’s plays was a story in 2000AD in which the plays were written by a time-travelling scholar from the future who travelled back in time to find out who wrote them, panicked when there was no sign of Shakespeare in Elizabethan England, and wrote them himself to make sure future generations wouldn’t miss out