Tag: research

 “No one talks like that. Sorry”: What are people doing when they discuss accents in film and television?

The Language and Communication Research cluster is delighted to welcome the distinguished linguist and literary scholar Professor Jane Hodson (University of Sheffield) for a presentation on what people are doing when they discuss the representation of accents in film and television.

When? Wednesday 7 February 2018, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room TBC, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

In an influential chapter, Rosina Lippi-Green explores the representation of different accents of English in animated Disney films. She finds a repeated pattern where “characters with strongly negative actions and motivations often speak varieties of English linked to specific geographical regions and marginalized groups” (1997: 80). This, she argues, serves to establish and disseminate stereotypes of specific linguistic groups to children. Lippi-Green herself does not attempt to investigate the uptake of these stereotypes among film viewers, but some recent work has begun to investigate the ways in which viewers respond to the representation of different language varieties in film, often using the comments thread on YouTube videos as data (see for example Androutsopoulos 2013 and Cecelia Cutler 2016).

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Jane Hodson’s 2014 monograph Dialect in Literature and Film

In this paper, I attempt to build on this work by focusing on the question of what people are doing when they discuss the representation of language varieties. To do this, I draw on three different sets of data: online discussions of film and television accents, a project where I recorded an undergraduate seminar on language variation in literature, and an experiment conducted in collaboration with a student where we manipulated the voices associated with animated characters and elicited responses from participants. I conclude that these data sets suggest that people are often performing highly complex acts when they discuss the representation of accent. At the same time, however, I think about whether or not these explicit discussions are rather different in nature from what people do when they simply watch film and television, and I ask if the findings from such studies get us any closer to understanding the effect of linguistic stereotyping in film.

Biography

HodsonJane Hodson is Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Sheffield. Her research interests lie at the interface of language and literature, and she is particularly concerned with the way in which style is contested at an ideological level. Her current area of research is the representation of dialect in English literature. In 2013 she completed the AHRC-funded project `Dialect in British Fiction 1800-1836‘. Her monograph, Dialect in Literature and Film, was published with Palgrave Macmillan in 2014. She edited a collection Dialect and Literature in the Long Nineteenth Century, which was published by Routledge in 2017.  She has an ongoing interest in the way in which Yorkshire English has been represented in film and literature over the past 200 years and has worked with a number of artists, poets, schools and archives on projects to engage the wider public with this work.

References

Androutsopoulos, Jannis. 2013 Participatory Culture and Metalinguistic Discourse: Performing and Negotiating German Dialects on YouTube. In: D. Tannen & AM Trester (eds.) Discourse 2.0. Language and New Media , 47-71. Washingtoin, DC: Georgetown University Press.

Cecelia Cutler. 2016. “ Ets jast ma booooooooooooo ” : Social meanings of Scottish accents on YouTube. In: Lauren Squires (ed.)  English in Computer-Mediated Communication : Variation, Representation, and Change, 69-98. De Gruyter. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Lippi-Green, Rosina. 1997. English with an Accent: Language, Ideology and Discrimination in the United States. London: Routledge.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

The long stories of short tales: genes, languages and the evolution of folk traditions

The Language and Communication Research cluster is delighted to welcome the acclaimed anthropologist Dr Jamie Tehrani (Durham University) for a presentation on the long stories of short tales: genes, languages and the evolution of folk traditions.

When? Monday 13th November 2017, 16.30 – 18.00

Where? Room C138 (College building), Middlesex University, Hendon campus

Many fairy tales are believed to be derived from oral folk traditions, some of which exhibit remarkable continuities across cultures. Versions of Cinderella and Little Red Riding Hood – to take two famous examples – have been recorded in places as diverse as Italy, England, China and Antigua. The question of when and where these so-called “international tale types” originated and how they spread is one that has preoccupied folkorists since the time of the Brothers Grimm. In this talk I will show how some answers can be gleaned by integrating cross-cultural patterns in folktales with data from population genetics and historical linguistics. I will also discuss some of the cultural and psychological properties that might make certain kinds of stories particularly “catchy” and memorable, enabling them to survive the wear-and-tear of oral transmission over so many generations and across such vast distances”

Biography

Jamie Tehrany’s research focuses on how culture evolves as it gets transmitted from person to person and from generation to generation. He is interested in understanding what makes some things catch on, others die out, and how these processes shape patterns of cultural diversity within and across populations. Dr Tehrany was trained in Social Anthropology at the London School of Economics (1995 – 1999) and gained a Master’s degree in Human Evolution and Behaviour at University College London (2000). He remained at UCL to study for a PhD in Anthropology (2005), writing his thesis on the transmission of craft traditions in Iranian tribal groups. In 2006 he took up a postdoctoral research fellowship at the AHRC Centre for the Evolution of Cultural Diversity (CECD) at University College London, before joining Durham in 2007 as a RCUK Fellow, where he was appointed as a Lecturer in Anthropology in 2012, and then Senior Lecturer in 2014. His current work focuses mainly on the transmission of popular narratives, such as traditional folktales, urban legends and modern day conspiracy theories.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

A Viewpoint is more than a Point of View: ‘Shades of Light’ and City Poetry

The Language and Communication Research cluster is delighted to welcome the acclaimed poet Mary Coghill for a poetry reading/presentation on A Viewpoint is more than a Point of View: ‘Shades of Light’ and City Poetry.

When? Wednesday 14 February 2018, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room TBC, Middlesex University, Hendon campus

For this poet, the definition of what might be called a ‘city poetic’ is ongoing.  The understanding of a viewpoint – from what angle the poet sees what is going on around him or her – is central.  The focused use of techniques and imagery which are sympathetic to the demands made by the city environment on those who live in the city day by day, night by night, is also crucial.  This presentation will examine, both through the examination of poetic theory and with examples from Shades of Light, how some of these issues are represented and interpreted, including through the use of Adobe Indesign software.

20130022111658img01Biography: Dr Mary Coghill

Creative Writing MA Plymouth University (2005) which included the narrative poem Designed to Fade (2006) Shearsman Books.

Creative Writing PhD from The London Metropolitan University (2011) with Professor Paul Cobley as Director of Studies: ‘A Theory and Praxis of a City Poetic: Jakobson, Poetic Function and City Space; Women, Deixis and the Narrator: A City Poem: ‘Shades of Light: A Triumph of City’; poem published (2012) www.cityofpoetry.co.uk

Visiting Research Fellowship at the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Studies, University of London (2014-17) included Assay of Blood and Gold: London (2017) www.cityofpoetry.co.uk and theoretical work on Jakobson and Metonymy.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Language and Communication Research Seminars 2017-18

We are beyond excited to announce the line-up of speakers for our 2017-18 Language and Communication Research Seminars at our Hendon Campus:

mdx

Term 1:

Term 2:

 

Further information about the presentations, including room numbers, titles and abstracts will be published soon.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Day schedule for Symposium on Close Reading

The full schedule for the day symposium on Close Reading, Codes and Interpretation is now confirmed:

MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

Room H116 (Hatchcroft building)

13 June 2017

0900 – 0930 Registration

0930 – 1015 PAUL COBLEY (Middlesex University)
‘The magic of codes: semiotics and close reading’
1015-1100 BARBARA BLEIMAN (English and Media Centre)
‘Close reading in Secondary English – practices, problems and solutions’

1100 – 1115 tea/coffee

1115 – 1200 ADRIAN PABLÉ (University of Hong Kong)
‘Interpretation, radical indeterminacy and close reading’
1200 – 1245 STEFAN PETO (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys)
‘Close reading at the chalk-face: strategies and observations in Key Stage 3’

1245 – 1345 Lunch & Launch of the undergraduate magazine Mesh

1345 – 1430 JON ORMAN (University of Hong Kong)
‘Thick description and/as close reading: some language-philosophical reflections’
1430 – 1515 BILLY CLARK (Middlesex University)
‘Pragmatic inference and reading processes’
1515 – 1600 MARCELLO GIOVANELLI (Aston University) and JESS MASON (Sheffield Hallam University)
‘Whose close reading?: emphasis, attention and cognition in the literature classroom’

1600 -1615 tea/coffee

1615 – 1700 ANDREA MACRAE (Oxford Brookes University)
‘Close reading as process and product’
1700 – 1745 LOUISA ENSTONE (Darrickwood School)
‘Is it time to stop pee-ing? A grassroots study into teaching reading and essay writing at Secondary’
1745 – 1800 JOHAN SIEBERS (Middlesex University)
‘Only the furthest distance would be closeness – semantic anarchism, close reading and academic practice’

1800 – 1900 Book launch: Critical Humanist Perspectives: The Integrational Turn in Philosophy of Language and Communication, edited by Adrian Pablé (Routledge, 2017).

For more information, and to register click here.

Last date to register for free teachers conference

illc_2016_speakers_mosaic

Our free conference for English teachers (mentioned in our previous post) is just under three weeks away. The last date to register is next Monday, 31st October.

This will be a really fun and useful event. Teachers always respond positively to the opportunity to step outside the classroom to exchange ideas,  to hear about current research, and to consider how to apply some of these ideas in class. Some of the sessions will focus on developing specific resources and activities for class.

This year, the conference takes place the day before the NATE (National Association for the Teaching of English) post-16 conference, New Directions in Post-16 English, which is also being hosted at Middlesex.

If you can spare two days, why not come to both? If you’re already coming to one, maybe you could take an extra day to attend the other event.

You can find out more and book for the Integrating English conference here:

Fourth Integrating English Conference for Teachers

and for New Directions in Post-16 English here:

New Directions in Post-16 English

There is also a blog for the Post-16 conference here:

Post-16 conference blog

Hope some more teachers out there can join us.

Contact me if you have any questions about this.

Short Course on Relevance Theory, October 2016

We are kicking off this year’s events of the Language and Communication Research Cluster with a 4-week intensive course on Relevance Theory, an influential theory of communication and cognition, starting on Monday the 10th of October at 3pm.

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Billy’s book on Relevance Theory

 

The course consists of four two-hour sessions over four weeks and will explore key notions of relevance theory and ways of testing and developing the theory. It will be particularly useful for early career researchers and graduate research students.

The sessions will be run by Billy Clark, Associate Professor in English Language and Linguistics, Media Department.

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Dr Billy Clark

 

The course is free and open to all.

Please note: sessions are not always in the same room. Rooms are:

10 October: Committee Room 2, Town Hall

17 October: C223, College Building

24 October: C223, College Building

31 October: Committee Room 2, Town Hall

For queries about this course, and to let us know you’ll be attending, please contact Billy Clark, b.clark@mdx.ac.uk or check http://lecturelist.org/content/view_lecture/15608