Teaching visit of Professor María Martínez Lirola

We are absolutely delighted to host Professor María Martínez Lirola (University of Alicante) for a teaching visit to BA English at Middlesex, between 18th and 22nd of March 2019.

This is a list of the diverse seminars she will lead at Middlesex University, London- all part of the Language & Communication Research Seminars series. Everyone is welcome!

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AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMAGE OF WOMEN IN COSMETIC SURGERY LEAFLETS: VISUAL GRAMMAR AS A TOOL TO DISCOVER STEREOTYPES. 

Tuesday, 19th March 2019, 16.00-18.00 at room PRTCB6B (Portacabin)

There are many texts in which images of women are used for different purposes in our society. This research explores the main strategies used to create meaning in multimodal texts used by leaflets advertising cosmetic surgery in Alicante (Spain).  The study aims to point out that women are treated as objects in these leaflets. To demonstrate this argument the main visual and linguistic characteristics will be analysed in multimodal texts in which people are persuaded of the benefits of such surgery. Special attention will be paid to the influence that the different linguistic and visual choices may have on society. This study reveals that the image of women that appears in some leaflets of this type is so aggressive that it could be understood as a new form of gender violence.


THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENRE THEORY AND THE IMPROVEMENT OF STUDENTS’ LITERACY. PRACTICAL EXAMPLES 

Wednesday, 20th March 2019, 14.30 -16.30, at room V105 (Vine building) 

The study reported in this paper focuses on the use of the Genre Theory in multilingual classrooms as an appropriate framework for English L2 writing. Our students’ mother tongues were Spanish, Valencian, French, Flemish, Italian, German and Rumanian. The Genre Theory was applied to increase students’ literacy skills through the study of text types and specific grammar structures that appear in these texts.

We will examine a corpus of twenty essays written by university students on the English Language V course at the University of Alicante before and after they have received instruction following the Genre Theory. The analysis of the essays will show that after receiving instruction on genres or text types, students have improved their written texts because they have mastered how the grammar of written language works and are aware of how grammatical features cluster in particular text types.

This study intends to point out that the Genre Theory has a crucial role in literacy since it concentrates on the production and analysis of texts in a given language. This research will highlight the relationship between, literacy and effective writing with an applied educational emphasis.  This paper will also highlight the pedagogical implications of teaching having the Genre Theory as a framework so that teachers and students can see in what ways this framework facilitates their teaching practice and guarantees their improvement in writing.


APPROACHING THE REPRESENTATION OF SUB-SAHARAN IMMIGRANTS IN A SAMPLE FROM THE SPANISH PRESS: DECONSTRUCTING STEREOTYPES 

Wednesday, 20th March 2019, 17.00-19.00, Room VG05 (Vine building).

Spain has become a country receiving immigrants in the last years. The majority of the items of news related to immigration that appear in the press exhibit negative characteristics. The main purpose of this article is to observe the linguistic and visual representation of Sub-Saharan immigrants in a sample of the Spanish press in order to answer the following research questions: how are Sub-Saharan immigrants portrayed linguistically and visually in the given press? What are the implications of the choices in language and images?

The researcher collected all the pieces of news related to Sub-Saharan immigrants in the three most popular Spanish newspapers, i.e., El País, ABC and El Mundo from 1 June 2011 to 31 December 2014. Visual grammar and critical discourse analysis (CDA) will be used in order to deconstruct the visual and linguistic representation of such immigrants. In addition, van Leeuwen’s (2008) classification of social actors will be used in the analysis.

The analysis demonstrates that the representation of Sub-Saharan immigrants displays the following characteristics: they are represented as vulnerable, lacking autonomy, as victims, etc. This representation does not contribute to the fact that the autochthonous population favours the integration of immigrants into the socio-economic structure, exercising the same rights as the Spanish population, and therefore that the dichotomy we-they is emphasized.


HOW CAN WE INTRODUCE CULTURE AND CRITICAL THINKING IN THE CLASSROOM? EXPLORING THE USE OF MULTIMODAL TEXTS IN THE CLASSROOM 

Thursday, 21st March 2019, 17.00-19.00, at room C110 (College building)

The multimodal nature of present societies makes clear that teaching with authentic multimodal texts can contribute to bring different cultural realities into the classroom. In this sense, it was decided to use texts published by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in order to teach visual grammar (Kress and van Leeuwen, 2006) in a master course.

These texts were also selected because they are appropriate to teach cultural aspects, and the reality of poor countries; they also allow the acquisition of interpersonal competences. This paper will point out that teaching students to be critical with the discourse produced by NGOs is essential in order to unveil relationships of domination and power because discourse is always a powerful tool used to reproduce social reality.


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María Martínez Lirola is Professor of the Department of English at the University of Alicante, Spain and Research Fellow at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Her main areas of research are Applied Linguistics, Critical Discourse Analysis and Systemic Functional Linguistics. She has published more than 70 papers and seven books, such as Main Processes of Thematization and Postponement in English (Peter Lang, 2009). She has been a visiting scholar in different universities such as: Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo (UASD, 2015), University of Nottingham, Malaysia campus (2015), University of British Columbia and University of Montréal (2014), Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada, 2012), University of South Africa, UNISA (Pretoria, South Africa, 2012), University of Anahuac Mayad (Mérida, Mexico, 2008), University of Kwazulu-Natal (Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, 2006), and Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia, 2005). She has presented papers in international congresses all over the world.

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.

Language and Communication Research Seminars 2018-19

We are very excited to confirm the fantastic line-up of presenters for our 2018-19 Language and Communication Research Seminars at our Hendon Campus. Hope to see you all there!

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  • Professor Chris Mabey (Middlesex), Letters from Myanmar. Friday, 11th January 2019, 15.30 – 16.30, Room WG48 (Williams building).

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Footage of conversation with Ian McGuire

Last month, Ian McGuire, author of the celebrated novel, The North Water, visited Middlesex to answer questions from BA English students. The event was sold out and a great success. If you missed it, or would like to watch it again, here’s the footage of the discussion.

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All English events at Middlesex this week

This is the busiest and most exciting week of the year in our English events calendar. We are hosting the final Language & Communication research seminar of this series, we are welcoming two Erasmus teaching visits in English, and Creative Writing & Journalism students are running this year’s Story Festival. Here’s a reminder of all events on campus this week. We hope you’ll join us in as many as you can:

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Tuesday, 13th March

  • 12.00-14.00 Metafiction in Postmodern American Literature and Popular Culture by Dr Aleksandra Vukotić (University of Belgrade), BG09B (Building 9)
  • 14.00-16.00: Trauma, Cultural Memory, and Identity in Sebastian Barry’s ‘A Long Long Way’ by Professor Ksenija Kondali (University of Sarajevo), C136 (College Building) – Open lecture

11.00-20.00 North London Story Festival (various rooms)

 

 

Wednesday, 14th March

12.00-14.00 Intertextuality in Jeanette Winterson’s ‘The Gap of Time’. By Dr Aleksandra Vukotić, CG48 (College Building)

16.00-17.30 The Embodied Nature of Narrative: Moving with purpose with others, and its disruption in autism. By Dr Jonathan Delafield-Butt (University of Strathclyde),  New room: BG02 (Building 9) Final Language & Communication Research Seminar for this year!

 

Thursday, 15th March

15.00 -17.00 Negotiating the Technological Sublime: DeLillo’s and Antonioni’s

Murder Mysteries. By Dr Aleksandra Vukotić, CG43 (College building) – Open lecture

 

ksenFriday, 16th  March

10.00-12.00 Whoever controls your eyeballs runs the world : A “Paranoid” Reading of Media. By Dr Aleksandra Vukotić, CG09 (College building)

15.00-17.00 Fictionalizing Transatlantic Slavery: A Comparative Study. By Professor Ksenija Kondali (University of Sarajevo), PAG02 (Portacabin)

 

All welcome!

For directions to Middlesex University Hendon campus, click here.

“No one talks like that. Sorry”: video-recording of Jane Hodson’s presentation

A couple of weeks ago the Language and Communication Research cluster welcomed distinguished linguist and literary scholar Professor Jane Hodson (University of Sheffield) for a presentation on what people are doing when they discuss the representation of accents in film and television.

Here’s a one-minute teaser of Jane’s fascinating talk.

And here’s the entire presentation!

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The lighting is not fantastic. Sorry. But the presentation well worth watching.

Happy watching!

The Embodied Nature of Narrative: Moving with purpose with others, and its disruption in autism

The Language and Communication Research cluster is delighted to welcome Dr. Jonathan Delafield-Butt, Reader in Child Development, University of Strathclyde for a presentation on The Embodied Nature of Narrative: Moving with purpose with others, and its disruption in autism.

When? Wednesday 14 March 2018, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room BG02 (Building 9) – please note room change, Middlesex University, Hendon campus

Abstract

In this talk I will examine the embodied, affective nature of human meaning-making before it achieves linguistic expression, as a route to basic principles of agency in movement with social awareness, affective contact, and learning to achieve projects of common purpose.   Conscious human experience is first evident in purposeful movements of the body made in basic actions in utero.1  Even at this early stage, these actions require an anticipation of their future effect, and generate basic satisfaction on their successful completion.  This constitutes the first form of knowledge, knowing ahead of time the effects of a particular self-motivated, self-generated action, and its likely affective value.  Made in intersubjective engagement after birth, these basic actions serve to co-create embodied narratives, or shared projects of meaning-making with common purpose.  These are first and foremost embodied, then become linguistic.2,3  In autism, new evidence demonstrates the subsecond timing and integration of basic motor agency is disrupted, thwarting consequent social engagement and learning.4,5  This emerging motor perspective in autism presents a strong embodied view of development, illustrates its importance when disrupted, and gives impetus for novel therapeutic routes that include embodied, motor rehabilitative strategies.

Bio

Jonathan Delafield ButtJonathan Delafield-Butt is Reader in Child Development and Director of the Laboratory for Innovation in Autism at the University of Strathclyde.  His work examines the origins of human experience and the embodied foundations of development, especially in neurodevelopmental disorder.  He began research with a Ph.D. in Developmental Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh, then extended to Developmental Psychology in work on the embodied nature of infant learning and development at the Universities of Edinburgh and Copenhagen.  He has held scholarships at Harvard University and at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Edinburgh University for bridgework between science and philosophy, and has trained pre-clinically in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy at the Scottish Institute for Human Relations.  His research combines disciplinary perspectives (neuroscience, psychology, movement science) to present new insight into early meaning-making in children, on the aetiology of autism spectrum disorder, and novel routes to therapeutic intervention.

References
  1. Delafield-Butt, J. T., & Gangopadhyay, N. (2013). Sensorimotor intentionality: The origins of intentionality in prospective agent action. Developmental Review, 33(4), 399-425. doi:10.1016/j.dr.2013.09.001
  2. Delafield-Butt, J. T., & Trevarthen, C. (2015). The ontogenesis of narrative: From moving to meaning. Frontiers in Psychology, 6. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01157
  3. Delafield-Butt, J., & Adie, J. (2016). The embodied narrative nature of learning. Mind Brain & Education, 10(2), 14. doi:10.1111/mbe.12120
  4. Trevarthen, C. & Delafield-Butt, J. T. Autism as a developmental disorder in intentional movement and affective engagement. Integr. Neurosci. 7, 49, doi:10.3389/fnint.2013.00049 (2013).
  5. Anzulewicz, A., Sobota, K. & Delafield-Butt, J. T. Toward the autism motor signature: Gesture patterns during smart tablet gameplay identify children with autism. Rep. 6, doi:10.1038/srep31107 (2016).

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018 Language & Communication research seminars.

 

Language and Communication Research Seminars 2017-18 – Term 2

We are delighted to confirm the updated lineup for the second term of our 2017-18 Language and Communication Research Seminars at our Hendon Campus.

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  • Wednesday, March 14, 12.00-14.00, Room CG48 (College Building): Aleksandra Vukotic (University of Belgrade): Intertextuality in Jeanette Winterson’s ‘The Gap of Time’. (new addition)

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.