National security as a motivation in language-in-education policy

The Language and Communication Research Cluster is delighted to announce a presentation by Professor Anthony J. Liddicoat (University of Warwick) on national security as a motivation in language-in-education policy.

When? Thursday, 26 March 2020, 15.00-16.00

Where? Room CG09 (College building), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

johan-R2-featForeign language education has often been associated with questions of preserving national security and, when this happens, the inclusion of security as part of the agenda for language education brings particular ideologies into the articulation of policies. One argument found commonly in language policy focused on security is the idea that ensuring security requires that a society as a whole has an understanding and knowledge of those nations or other groups which pose possible security threats and language education is seen as a way to develop such understanding and knowledge. However, what is meant by knowledge and understanding of another can be constructed in different ways.

This presentation will examine both general issues relating to language education policies relating to national security and also specific policy initiatives at particular historical moments during which security has been a key government concern. Both orientations consider language as a barrier for effective national security but construct the solution to such a barrier in different ways. They also construct different expectations around language learners and the ways that language learners are thought to intervene to resolve issues of national security.

 

Research Interests

Picture by www.edwardmoss.co.uk All rights reserved Warwick UniversityProfessor Tony Liddicoat’s research spans a number of areas of applied linguistics including language education, language policy and planning and discourse analysis. Much of his work has focused on the relationship between intercultural understanding and language teaching and learning and the ways that learning a foreign language can promote intercultural capabilities. He is especially interested in understanding how classroom practices that look at the interrelationships between language and culture in the processes of making, communicating and interpreting meanings can enhance language education. He is also interested in how societies and institutions plan language education and what the consequences of this are teachers, students and the society at large.

Biography

Professor Tony Liddicoat’s educational background is in descriptive and applied linguistics and he completed his PhD in Norman French dialects in the Department of French at the University of Melbourne. Since then the focus of his work has mainly been in applied linguistics. Before going to the University of Warwick in 2016, he worked at a number of universities in Australia teaching in both linguistics and applied linguistics. In 1999, he was one of the founding editors of the journal Current Issues in Language Planning, and since 2014 I have been the Executive Editor.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

‘Don’t Mess with Mr. In-Between’: National and Sexual Identities in Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME Dr Yael Maurer (Tel Aviv University) FOR A seminar ON National and Sexual Identities in Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia.

When? Thursday, 10th October 2019, 16.00 – 18.00

Where? Room VG06, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

yael1

In the session, Dr Maurer will be introducing the opening of Kureishi’s novel where he explores the ties between national and sexual identities in the figure of his protagonist, Karim Amir, “an Englishman born and bred, almost” as the famous opening lines of the novel put it. We’ll explore  the notion of an “in-between” state which becomes  central in  the novel’s construction of identity dilemmas, and question how Kureishi presents this option in his novel. The Buddha of Suburbia is a buildunsgroman, a novel about growing up and becoming a man. We’ll see how Kureishi interrogates notions of sexuality, masculinity and nationality in the figure of his youthful protagonist who embodies identity dilemmas  faced by many second generation immigrants in Britain.

 

Biographical Note

Dr. Yael Maurer is Lecturer at the English and American Studies Department at Tel Aviv University, Israel. Her doctoral research focused on “Living on a Broken Mirror: Imitative Modes in Rushdie’s Fiction” (Tel Aviv University, 2009).

Selected publications include:

The Science Fiction Dimensions of Salman Rushdie, McFarland Press (2014).book

Cityscapes of the Future: Urban Spaces in Science Fiction ( Co-Editor),  2018.

“The Body Politic: Philip Roth’s Vision of America”.  The Political Companion to Philip Roth.  Lee Trepanier and Claudia Fanziska Bruhwiller (Editors). University of Kentucky Press (May  2017).

“Undying Histories: Washington Irving’s Gothic Afterlives” Carol Davison (Editor) International Gothic Series, University of Manchester Press( March, 2017).

“Sometimes a Bomb is More than a Blowup; Hitchcock’s’ Sabotage” in Interdisciplinary Humanities: Hitchcock: A Series of Beneficial Shocks. Michael Howarth (Editor). Spring, 2015, Vol. 32.1

The Monstrous Feminine: Reimagining Aliens in American Horror Films”. The Devil You Know: Evil in American Popular Culture. Sharon Packer and Jody Pennington (Editors), Praeger Press. July 2014.

“Not English but Londoners’: Hanif Kureishi’s Sammy and Rosie Get Laid”, The Literary London Journal, Volume 11 Number 1 Spring/Autumn 2014

“Rage Against the Machine: Cyberspace Narratives in Rushdie’s Fury“. The Journal of Commonwealth Literature (47:1). March, 2012

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.