Two trailblazing BA English students recognised for their contribution to student life at the 2019 MDXSU Awards

MDXSU Awards celebrate the trailblazing students at Middlesex University and this year BA English students won the double! The entire English subject area couldn’t be prouder.

The annual MDXSU awards – in their fifth year – are Middlesex Students’ Union’s way of celebrating the work and achievements of Middlesex University students over the past year, and recognising the contribution they have made to the university, the community and the lives of their fellow students.

 

Student Voice Leader of the Year

The shortlist…

  • Fazila Shaikh
  • Florentina-Daniela Bonghene
  • Kristian Karvay
  • Melissa Nabre

The winner…

Melissa Nabre (BA English)

“Melissa has been really engaged with the role is year – chairing the Programme Voice Group, which meant students are really at the heart of decisions made about the programme. Melissa ensured lots of changes are made at a programme level but also have been involved in other activities throughout MDXSU. She has successfully passed policy through the Student Leaders’ Conference which means self-defence classes will be available for all genders, supported some of the full-time officer campaigns and even had time be on the POW! Committee.”

 

Super POW!er of the Year

The shortlist…

  • Ahmad Jolghazi
  • Gytis Kezys
  • Katya Turikova 
  • Natalie Rose

The winner…

Natalie Rose (BA English)

“Natalie Rose has shown incredible passion, motivation and commitment this year, volunteering her time over several Freshers’ events and being active in committee meetings throughout the year. Natalie has shown great vision for her area of POW!, and her enthusiasm in turning this idea into reality. The panel felt that the POW! News platform would be nowhere without Natalie’s efforts.”

Huge congratulations to those shortlisted or won an award this year!🏆

 

Read the full results at .

What our recent graduates have been doing

We wanted to  the content on the BA English course pages, to include specific case studies of students who went on to find jobs or built careers after graduating. I sent an email round to our amazing recent-ish graduates, and these are some of the really inspiring responses I received. From teaching to financial services and speech therapy – our graduates thrive in the widest range of careers.
Tasnim Ahmed – English Teacher

tasnim Ahmed _ english‘I graduated in 2016 and started training to become a  teacher shortly after that. I am currently completing my NQT year as a Teacher of English at Chiltern Academy in Luton. Chiltern Academy is a brand new secondary school in Luton which opened in September 2018. It has been an incredible experience right from the beginning, especially being part of the journey to making our first year at Chiltern a success. I have recently been promoted to the role of Subject Coordinator and look forward to further facilitating and encouraging the learning of English as well as developing our curriculum to ensure all our pupils achieve the best possible outcome. I strongly feel that my degree has enabled me to secure (what I believe) is the best job in the world! Nothing beats the feeling of knowing you are making an impact and inspiring the next generation.’

Check  Chiltern Academy’s Twitter @ChilternA to have a look at what Tasnim’s pupils have been doing in English this year!

 

Amanda Emery – Speech and Language Therapist

‘When I graduate from English at Middlesex, I was lucky enough to get a brilliant job as a Speech and Language Therapy Assistant for the NHS with children with complex needs and children who are deaf. I worked there for one year to gain experience for my Masters application, as the course is extremely competitive and I was fortunate enough to be accepted onto the last NHS funded programme and to become a qualified Speech and Language Therapist.

During my final year on the BA English course I remember not being sure of what I wanted to do and  a tutor mentioned past students career paths had included working as a Speech and Language Therapist  (Which I am very thankful for- as I had never even heard of the profession previously!)

There is a big drive for more diversity in the profession and also to increase awareness of the role to the general public – I would fully recommend becoming a speech and language therapist.’

Name withheld – Banking 

‘During the final year of my degree, I found myself curious about the world of finance but in particular the world of Banking. However considering I was studying a degree in English, I assumed this would be highly unlikely.

Since graduating I worked at Mizuho Bank as a Credit Risk Analyst, then moving on to work at Credit Suisse as a Trade Support Analyst within the Fixed Income Bonds market.’

 

Hiba Hussein – English teacher

‘I went on to do a PGCE and I have now almost finished my second year as a teacher at Haverstock School in Camden (where the Milibands once attended). It is an inner London comprehensive school with a very diverse body of students and staff. I am really enjoying teaching and inspiring young people. I am currently gathering the experience and skills to move on to a more pastoral leadership role in the future i.e. head of year.’

Kvetoslava Drabikova – Accountancy 

KvetoslavaFinally, Kvetoslava Drabikova, who is already on our course page, currently works for Omnicom Media Group, which has recently been recognized as one of the top media agencies in the world by WARC. She is applying the strong communication and project management skills she developed at her English degree at Middlesex in her career in accountancy in London.

 

‘Middlesex Echo’ out now

The first issue of The Middlesex Echo arrived on campus on March 16th and is already completely ‘sold out’. The Middlesex Echo is the brand new student newspaper at Middlesex University.

Created and produced by students only, it’s a unique way to hear the voices of Middlesex Students. Natalie Rose, second year BA English student, is the first issue’s editor. The newspaper is full of opinion pieces, feature articles and creative work by BA English and many other Middlesex students.

pow

 

They are on the lookout for new contributors and sub-editors and everyone can get involved.

You can follow them on twitter @mdxecho and on facebook.

 

 

An analysis of the image of women in cosmetic surgery leaflets: visual grammar as a tool to discover stereotypes

We are absolutely delighted to host Professor María Martínez Lirola (University of Alicante) for a seminar on her cutting-edge research on the use of image of women in cosmetic surgery leaflets.

When Tuesday, 19th March 2019, 16.00-18.00

Where? Room PRTCB6B (Portacabin), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

There are many texts in which images of women are used for different purposes in our society. This research explores the main strategies used to create meaning in multimodal texts used by leaflets advertising cosmetic surgery in Alicante (Spain).  The study aims to point out that women are treated as objects in these leaflets. To demonstrate this argument the main visual and linguistic characteristics will be analysed in multimodal texts in which people are persuaded of the benefits of such surgery. Special attention will be paid to the influence that the different linguistic and visual choices may have on society. This study reveals that the image of women that appears in some leaflets of this type is so aggressive that it could be understood as a new form of gender violence.

Bionote

lirolaMaría Martínez Lirola is Professor of the Department of English at the University of Alicante, Spain and Research Fellow at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Her main areas of research are Applied Linguistics, Critical Discourse Analysis and Systemic Functional Linguistics. She has published more than 70 papers and seven books, such as Main Processes of Thematization and Postponement in English (Peter Lang, 2009). She has been a visiting scholar in different universities such as: Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo (UASD, 2015), University of Nottingham, Malaysia campus (2015), University of British Columbia and University of Montréal (2014), Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada, 2012), University of South Africa, UNISA (Pretoria, South Africa, 2012), University of Anahuac Mayad (Mérida, Mexico, 2008), University of Kwazulu-Natal (Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, 2006), and Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia, 2005). She has presented papers in international congresses all over the world.

 

This is the full list of all the diverse seminars Professor Lirola will lead during her stay at Middlesex – all part of the Language & Communication Research Seminars series. Everyone is welcome!

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.

New book by Middlesex colleague: In Defence of Political Correctness

Are we really free to say what we want in a liberal democracy? Or has being Politically Correct now been replaced by anti-political correctness? In this book, Middlesex Professor, Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, argues that PC made public discourse more civilized. And that when people say what they damn well want, you end up with trolls, Trump and Farage and a nasty, toxic environment.

cover_9781785904141
Journalist of the Year, Yasmin Alibhai Brown is a broadcaster and author of several books. A columnist for the i and the Mirror, she is a well-known commentator on diversity, immigration and multiculturalism. She is the author of Refusing the Veil and her most recent book is Exotic England. She was awarded Broadsheet Columnist of the Year at the 2017 Press Awards.
Yasmin says: – “Libel laws, editorial judgements, broadcasting restrictions, the political atmosphere all impose limits on free speech. And yet when women, minorities, young, LGBT and disabled people object to demeaning language or, indeed, demand equality, traditionalists shout out ‘It’s PC gone mad’.  There are leading voices in this country- people like Boris Johnson, Julie Burchill. Ken Livingstone- who stoke up ugly passions in the name of freedom. Without self-moderation, our streets, schoolyards, public transport, waiting rooms and restaurants would turn into bear pits. Most citizens understand that. Some, however, seem determined to cause disorder in the name of free speech. Powerful, Machiavellian and wealthy individuals are leading this disruption and breaking the old consensus.
Thus, anti-political correctness has taken over the UK and US, spearheaded by some of the most influential voices in media and politics. Invective, lies, hate speech, bullying, intemperance and prejudice have become the new norms. Intolerance is justified through invocations of liberty. Restraint is oppression. A new order has been established in which racism, sexism, homophobia and xenophobia are proudly expressed.” In this powerful new book, Yasmin Alibhai-Brown puts forth a spirited defence of political correctness, forcefully arguing that, despite many failures, this movement has led to a more civilised, equal and tolerant world. By tracing the history and definition of the term, Alibhai-Brown looks to clarify the very nature of PC, which is ultimately grounded in human decency, understanding and compassion – all of which are essential for a safer and kinder world.

https://www.bitebackpublishing.com/books/in-defence-of-political-correctness

 

Language and Communication Research Seminars 2018-19

We are very excited to confirm the fantastic line-up of presenters for our 2018-19 Language and Communication Research Seminars at our Hendon Campus. Hope to see you all there!

about-us-banner.jpg

  • Professor Chris Mabey (Middlesex), Letters from Myanmar. Friday, 11th January 2019, 15.30 – 16.30, Room WG48 (Williams building).

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Reading on Screen: challenging myths and misperceptions of reading in the digital age

The Language and Communication research cluster is delighted to welcome Professor Bronwen Thomas (Bournemouth University) for a presentation on Reading on Screen: challenging myths and misperceptions of reading in the digital age.

When? Friday 8th February 2019, 14.30 – 15.30

Where? Room V105, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Debates about digital reading are beset by stereotypes such as those of the ‘digital native’, and crude binaries about print vs screen cultures.  Two projects supported by the AHRC – Researching Readers Online (2012) and The Digital Reading Network (2013-14) – set out to provide more nuanced insights into the practices of digital readers and to explore new approaches to the study of readers based on the rich data about reading available to us thanks to the digital revolution.  A third project, Reading on Screen (2017-18), employed innovative participatory methods to create over 30 digital stories reflecting the complex and often contradictory experiences of contemporary readers from a variety of social backgrounds and ages.

In this paper, I will reflect on the efficacy of the digital storytelling method for eliciting reader responses of a radically different kind to those we are accustomed to from academic studies reliant on interviews, questionnaires or textual analysis.  I will also outline the main outcomes and impact of the project, both planned and unplanned, particularly focusing on group dynamics, benefits reported by participants, and follow on activities and creative projects initiated by them.

Bronwen Thomas

BIO

Bronwen Thomas is Professor of English and New Media at Bournemouth University and Director of the Centre for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community. She has led three AHRC funded projects on digital reading, and has published widely on new media narratives, fanfiction and online communities. Bronwen is currently writing a book on Literature and Social Media.

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.