English PhD students win awards at RSSC2021: An International Research Gathering

On 23rd of June 2021, we gathered online to celebrate the research carried out by Middlesex University researchers. 2021 marked the 10th year of the Research Students’ Summer Conference, with 120 presenters from research students and early career researchers from Middlesex overseas campuses, our Partner Institutions and our London campus.

More than 300 attendees and presenters registered for RSSC2021, from 29 countries. 32 prizes were presented by Dr Onatade to the best presentations and posters and the details of winners can be found here.

One of the prize winners for outstanding oral presentation was first year MPhil/PhD in English student Thanh Nguyen for her presentation on the ‘Effects of Metacognitive Reading Strategy Instruction on L2 Reading Comprehension and Motivation: A Meta-Analysis and An Empirical Investigation’. Congratulations also to second year MPhil/PhD in English student Thitinart Khamyod for her presentation: ‘From Verbal to Online Interactions: Requests in One-to-one Facebook Chats in Thai Educational Settings’ and to finalist PhD student Ramona Pistol for her presentation ‘Aesthetic experience in metaphorical comprehension’. Congratulations to all presenters and winners!

25 poster presentations and approximately 90 oral presentations were delivered, across three time slots of 8 parallel sessions each. It was a remarkable demonstration of the diversity of disciplines and the multidisciplinarity or research projects carried out in MDX Research Community: sports science, psychology and psychotherapy, English, performing arts, natural sciences, computer science, business and management, law and criminology, covid-19 related studies, organisational theology and theological studies, design, engineering and mathematics and so much more that can be viewed in the RSSC2021 Programme and Book of Abstracts.    

Our Vice-Chancellor Prof Nic Beech delivered the opening keynote speech, setting out the position of research in the University’s strategy and in the years ahead. MDX professional doctorate alumna Dr Raliat Onatade, Group Chief Pharmacist and Clinical Director for Medicines Optimisation at NHS Barts trust – who played a central role in setting up pharmacy services at the NHS Nightingale – gave the closing address. Raliat was introduced by Prof Hemda Garelick and another engaging conversation followed her inspiring and thought-provoking speech.  She talked about her journey as a researcher: making the transition from being a medical professional to a doctoral student, her approach to translating academic research into effective practice, and giving advice to early career researchers from her experience.

Find more about RSSC2021 here.

Supercategory Semantics: Religion, Science, History

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER Is delighted to invite you to our first seminar for 2020, by Dr Adrian Pablé, Associate Professor at the University of Hong Kong:

When? Monday, 13th January 2020, 16.45 – 17.45

Where? Room VG06, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Dr PableIn this talk Adrian will offer some reflections on the concept of the ‘Supercategory’, as outlined by Oxford linguist Roy Harris in the books The Necessity of Art (2003), The Linguistics of History (2004) and The Semantics of Science (2005). Harris argues that academic disciplines like Science, History and Religion (among others) are either built on realist surrogationalist philosophies of language, whereby words mean by ‘standing for’ something other than itself, or on holistic models of language based on some form of idealism.

Against this background Adrian will introduce Harris’ integrational linguistics as a third (semiological) alternative, with its emphasis on human activity and on the integration (or contextualization) of signs.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

Language and Communication Research Seminars 2018-19

We are very excited to confirm the fantastic line-up of presenters for our 2018-19 Language and Communication Research Seminars at our Hendon Campus. Hope to see you all there!

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  • Professor Chris Mabey (Middlesex), Letters from Myanmar. Friday, 11th January 2019, 15.30 – 16.30, Room WG48 (Williams building).

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Through two lenses: Re-enregistering Cypriot Greek as ‘slang’ in London’s Greek Cypriot diaspora

The Language and Communication research cluster is delighted to welcome Dr Petros Karatsareas (University of Westminster) for a presentation on Through two lenses: Re-enregistering Cypriot Greek as ‘slang’ in London’s Greek Cypriot diaspora

When? Friday 8th March 2019, 14.30 – 15.30

Where? Room V105, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

In the context of Cyprus, Standard Modern Greek and Cypriot Greek have traditionally been viewed as two discrete and mutually exclusive linguistic entities that form a binary diglossic opposition à la Ferguson (1959) with Standard Modern Greek being the High code and Cypriot Greek being the Low code (Moschonas, 1996, 2002; Arvaniti 2006/2010). More recent proposals, however, describe a register continuum (Tsiplakou, Papapavlou, Pavlou & Katsoyannou, 2006; Papapavlou & Sophocleous, 2009). At the one end of the continuum, we find an acrolectal register that incorporates a high number of lexical, phonological and grammatical features (thought to be) found in the standard variety of the language as it is spoken in Greece. At the other end, we find a basilectal register that incorporates a high number of features originating in the regional varieties of Greek spoken in Cyprus. One of the two main labels that speakers of Cypriot Greek use to describe this register is xorkátika (cipriaká) ‘villagey (Cypriot)’, associating it with notions of rurality and a general lack of sophistication and manners captured collectively under the related label xorkaθ‘peasantry’.

In this contribution, I draw on data collected as part of a larger ethnographic investigation of language practices among London’s Greek Cypriot diaspora (see Karatsareas, 2018) to argue that, in London and as a result of being transplanted from a rural to an urban context where the majority language is English, Cypriot Greek was re-enregistered (in the sense of Agha, 2003, 2007) on the basis of ideological conceptualisations of English non-standard varieties vis-à-vis Standard English. Evidence in support of this thesis is found in the fact that, in addition to the known label xorkátika (cipriaká), British-born speakers of Cypriot Greek, who are dominant in English, describe their heritage language as a type of Greek ‘slang’ and also as spazména (elliniká) ‘broken (Greek)’, two labels unknown to the Cyprus context. In the use of the former term, we see the recognition of the informality and orality of Cypriot Greek as well as of the ways in which it challenges social and linguistic conventions. The latter term is not applied, as would be expected, to contact-induced phenomena in the speech of English-dominant speakers that would be ungrammatical in the speech of Cypriot Greek monolinguals. Rather, it is applied to basilectal features of Cypriot Greek such as the postalveolar fricative [tʃ] and words that contain it such as tʃe ‘and’ by virtue of their lack from acrolectal registers and Standard Modern Greek. This suggests that, in the diasporic context, the similarities between basilectal registers of Cypriot Greek and non-standard English varieties in terms of informality, orality and difference from the respective standards enhanced the pre-existing perception that Cypriot Greek is an inferior form of language.

 

Bio

petrosDr Petros Karatsareas is a Lecturer in English Language and Linguistics at the University of Westminster. He holds a Ptychion in Greek Philology from the University of Athens, and an M.Phil. in Linguistics and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Cambridge. He specialises in multilingualism focusing on the languages of the UK’s minority ethnic communities. He explores the factors that play a role in intergenerational transmission and maintenance, looking specifically at ideologies of monolingualism, attitudes towards multilingualism, and attitudes towards non-prestigious linguistic varieties. He is also interested in community language teaching and learning looking at how community languages are taught in complementary schools and the role these schools play in language maintenance and ideology.

He addresses these issues based on his research on London’s Greek Cypriot diaspora. He is also actively involved in a range of public engagement activities raising awareness about the value of non-standard linguistic varieties and about the contribution of the Greek Cypriot community to London’s multicultural and multilingual character. His research has received the financial support of the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (through the Open World Research Initiative).

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.