Tag: linguistics

Day schedule for Symposium on Close Reading

The full schedule for the day symposium on Close Reading, Codes and Interpretation is now confirmed:

MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

Room H116 (Hatchcroft building)

13 June 2017

0900 – 0930 Registration

0930 – 1015 PAUL COBLEY (Middlesex University)
‘The magic of codes: semiotics and close reading’
1015-1100 BARBARA BLEIMAN (English and Media Centre)
‘Close reading in Secondary English – practices, problems and solutions’

1100 – 1115 tea/coffee

1115 – 1200 ADRIAN PABLÉ (University of Hong Kong)
‘Interpretation, radical indeterminacy and close reading’
1200 – 1245 STEFAN PETO (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys)
‘Close reading at the chalk-face: strategies and observations in Key Stage 3’

1245 – 1345 Lunch & Launch of the undergraduate magazine Mesh

1345 – 1430 JON ORMAN (University of Hong Kong)
‘Thick description and/as close reading: some language-philosophical reflections’
1430 – 1515 BILLY CLARK (Middlesex University)
‘Pragmatic inference and reading processes’
1515 – 1600 MARCELLO GIOVANELLI (Aston University) and JESS MASON (Sheffield Hallam University)
‘Whose close reading?: emphasis, attention and cognition in the literature classroom’

1600 -1615 tea/coffee

1615 – 1700 ANDREA MACRAE (Oxford Brookes University)
‘Close reading as process and product’
1700 – 1745 LOUISA ENSTONE (Darrickwood School)
‘Is it time to stop pee-ing? A grassroots study into teaching reading and essay writing at Secondary’
1745 – 1800 JOHAN SIEBERS (Middlesex University)
‘Only the furthest distance would be closeness – semantic anarchism, close reading and academic practice’

1800 – 1900 Book launch: Critical Humanist Perspectives: The Integrational Turn in Philosophy of Language and Communication, edited by Adrian Pablé (Routledge, 2017).

For more information, and to register click here.

‘Close reading, codes and interpretation’ – booking open and line-up confirmed

ooking to our one-day symposium on ‘Close reading, codes and interpretation’, hosted by the Language & Communication is now open.

book message cloud shape Book here.

When? 9 am-7 pm, Tuesday 13th June 2017
Where?
Room H116, Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, London, NW4 4BT

In some reckonings, ‘close reading’ is now around 90 years old, having been inaugurated in I. A. Richards’ Principles of Literary Criticism (1926) and Practical Criticism (1929). The close reading of texts has become arguably the central activity of the humanities and close reading is carried out across different levels of education and through a number of disciplines. As its practitioners recognize, procedures of close reading can become ossified into routine practices of code identification rather than active interpretation.

This day symposium seeks to ask what ‘close reading’ is like now, how it is exercised in education in different contexts and how it might differ from or resemble ‘codes’ of reading. It features papers by teachers in Higher Education, Further Education and Secondary Education, including:

  • BARBARA BLEIMAN (English and Media Centre): ‘Close reading in Secondary English –  practices, problems and solutions’
  • BILLY CLARK (Middlesex University): ‘Pragmatic inference and reading processes’
  • PAUL COBLEY (Middlesex University): ‘The magic of codes: semiotics and close reading’
  • LOUISA ENSTONE (Darrickwood School): ‘Is it time to stop pee-ing? A grassroots study into teaching reading and essay writing at Secondary’
  • MARCELLO GIOVANELLI (Aston University) and JESS MASON (Sheffield Hallam University): ‘Whose close reading?: emphasis, attention and cognition in the literature classroom’
  • ANDREA MACRAE (Oxford Brookes University): ‘Close reading as process and product’
  • JON ORMAN (University of Hong Kong): ‘Thick description and/as close reading: some language-philosophical reflections’
  • ADRIAN PABLÉ (University of Hong Kong): ‘Interpretation, radical indeterminacy and close reading’
  • STEFAN PETO (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys): ‘Close reading at the chalk-face: strategies and observations in Key Stage 3’
  • JOHAN SIEBERS (Middlesex University): ‘Only the furthest distance would be closeness – semantic anarchism, close reading and academic practice’what-reading

Cost: £10 flat fee (includes lunch and refreshments)

For the full day schedule, click here.

For any questions, please email Billy Clark b.clark@mdx.ac.uk or Paul Cobley p.cobley@mdx.ac.uk

Close reading, codes and interpretation: Speakers and room confirmed

Our Language & Communication research cluster warmly invites you the one-day symposium on ‘Close reading, codes and interpretation’. Room number and speakers have now been confirmed

When? 9 am-7 pm, Tuesday 13th June 2017

Where? Room H116, Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, London, NW4 4BTmdxIn some reckonings, ‘close reading’ is now around 90 years old, having been inaugurated in I. A. Richards’ Principles of Literary Criticism (1926) and Practical Criticism (1929). The close reading of texts has become arguably the central activity of the humanities and close reading is carried out across different levels of education and through a number of disciplines. As its practitioners recognize, procedures of close reading can become ossified into routine practices of code identification rather than active interpretation.

This day symposium seeks to ask what ‘close reading’ is like now, how it is exercised in education in different contexts and how it might differ from or resemble ‘codes’ of reading. It features talks by experts in education, including school teachers and university academics. Our speakers are:

  • Barbara Bleiman (English and Media Centre)
  • Billy Clark (Middlesex University)
  • Paul Cobley (Middlesex University)
  • Louisa Enstone (Darrick Wood School)
  • Marcello Giovanelli (Aston University) and Jess Mason (Sheffield Hallam University)
  • Andrea Macrae (Oxford Brookes University)
  • Jon Orman (University of Hong Kong)
  • Adrian Pablé (University of Hong Kong)
  • Stefan Peto (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys)
  • Johan Siebers (Middlesex University)

Cost: £10 flat fee (includes lunch and refreshments).

Registration opens soon.

For further details in the meantime, please email Paul Cobley p.cobley@mdx.ac.uk

Symposium on Close Reading in Education: 13th June 2017

The Language and Communication Research Cluster is pleased to announce its upcoming whole-day symposium on Close reading, codes and interpretation.

In some reckonings, ‘close reading’ is now around 90 years old, having been inaugurated in I. A. Richards’ Principles of Literary Criticism (1926) and Practical Criticism (1929). The close reading of texts has become arguably the central activity of the humanities and close reading is carried out across different levels of education and through a number of disciplines. As its practitioners recognize, procedures of close reading can become ossified into routine practices of code identification rather than active interpretation. This symposium seeks to ask what ‘close reading’ is like now, how it is exercised in education at different levels and how it might differ from or resemble ‘codes’ of reading.

The symposium will include presentations from academics as well as teachers in secondary education.what-reading

When? 9 am- 7 pm, Tuesday 13th June 2017

Where? Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, London, NW4 4BT

The day will also include the launch of the undergraduate magazine Mesh and of the volume Critical Humanist Perspectives: The Integrational Turn in Philosophy of Language and Communication, edited by Adrian Pablé (Routledge, 2017).

More information and a full day schedule to follow.

Upcoming Language & Communication Research Seminars

 

We are getting really excited about our first Language and Communication Research Seminar of this academic year:

Naturalising Interpretation – Interpreting Naturalism: Towards a Neurosemiotic Model of Interpretation

Date: Thursday 10th November 2016

Time: 15.00-16.00

Location: Committee Room 2, Town Hall, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

James Carney from Lancaster University discusses whether interpretation is a mode of inquiry or a cognitive capacity that should itself be a target of inquiry. For more information on James’s talk, click here.

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We have an impressive list of even more speakers and events lined up for you, including:

All event are on Thursdays 15.00-16.00, unless otherwise stated and we really hope to see you there!

For more information, or to be added to our events mailing list, please email Anna (a.charalambidou@mdx.ac.uk).

Looking for inspiration on PhD topics?

If you are looking for inspiration for a PhD topic in English, here’s what our current PhD students are up to.

In a recent round table discussion, our current PhD students discussed with each other their doctoral projects. I was impressed both by the fascinating topics and novel approaches but also by the interesting questions our students asked each other.

Here are the topics of some of our current research candidates in language, linguistics and literature:

  • Kick the bucket1000-59719058_thumbnail-744x635

How can you teach English idioms to learners of English as a foreign language? Salim proposes that this should be done through the medium of learners’ home culture.

  • Do you say ‘napkin’ or ‘serviette’?

Narmina is looking at the factors that affect choices between synonyms.

  • This government is a parasite

Are some metaphors easier to understand than others? Ramona explores the (different) systems through which we process metaphors, employing Relevance Theory.

  • Neoliberalism promises meritocracy, upward social mobility, and individual freedoms. Surely it’s a good thing, then!

Tatjana explores the subversion and containment of neoliberal ideology in Black British fiction from the 80s to present day.

  • Do you change the way you speak when addressing ‘foreigners’?

Kyu looks at how speakers adjust their language when they understand their interlocutor as a member of the same or a different culture, employing approaches from pragmatics.

  • ‘If you spoil Star Wars for  me, I will Imperial March my way over to you.’

Do we employ semantic or pragmatics processes to understand ‘imperial march’ in this tweet? Benoit argues that Construction Grammar and Relevance Theory are in fact complementary perspectives and help us understand the semantics-pragmatic interface.

Can’t wait to see how all these projects evolve!