Reading and distributed perspectives workshop: 8-9 May 2019

This workshop, run by the Language and Communication Research Cluster, is designed to foster further development of the interface of current research into reading, textual analysis, distributed language and associated perspectives.

PROGRAMME

Wednesday, 8 May 2019, in Room CG06

1230 to 1315 Arrival and lunch

1315 to 1330 Introduction – PAUL COBLEY and JOHAN SIEBERS (both Middlesex University)

1330 to 1415 ‘Rereading Whorf: The Aufhebung of linguistic relativity and its implications for textual analysis’ – JOHAN SIEBERS

1415 to 1500 ‘Reading, reality and distributed perspectives’ – PAUL COBLEY

1500 to 1545 ‘Deflating symbols’ – STEPHEN COWLEY (University of Southern Denmark)

1545 to 1615 Tea/Coffee

1615 to 1700 “Reading close in class” – ALAN DURANT (Middlesex University)

1700 to 1745 ‘Shared acts of reading across digital platforms’ – BRONWEN THOMAS (Bournemouth University)
Thursday, 9 May 2019, in Room CG11

1000 to 1045 ‘Wikipedia and the social construction of neutrality’ – STEFAN LUTSCHINGER (Middlesex University)

1045 to 1130 ‘Reading beyond the reader: a multiscale view on reading’ – SARAH BRO TRASMUNDI (University of Southern Denmark)

1130 to 1215 ‘Hearing narratives’ – ADAM LIVELY and TANSY SPINKS (both Middlesex University)

1215 to 1245 Lunch

1245 to 1500 Project discussion

1500 Close

 

For more details, feel free to email Professor Paul Cobley at p.cobley@mdx.ac.uk.

An analysis of the image of women in cosmetic surgery leaflets: visual grammar as a tool to discover stereotypes

We are absolutely delighted to host Professor María Martínez Lirola (University of Alicante) for a seminar on her cutting-edge research on the use of image of women in cosmetic surgery leaflets.

When Tuesday, 19th March 2019, 16.00-18.00

Where? Room PRTCB6B (Portacabin), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

There are many texts in which images of women are used for different purposes in our society. This research explores the main strategies used to create meaning in multimodal texts used by leaflets advertising cosmetic surgery in Alicante (Spain).  The study aims to point out that women are treated as objects in these leaflets. To demonstrate this argument the main visual and linguistic characteristics will be analysed in multimodal texts in which people are persuaded of the benefits of such surgery. Special attention will be paid to the influence that the different linguistic and visual choices may have on society. This study reveals that the image of women that appears in some leaflets of this type is so aggressive that it could be understood as a new form of gender violence.

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lirolaMaría Martínez Lirola is Professor of the Department of English at the University of Alicante, Spain and Research Fellow at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Her main areas of research are Applied Linguistics, Critical Discourse Analysis and Systemic Functional Linguistics. She has published more than 70 papers and seven books, such as Main Processes of Thematization and Postponement in English (Peter Lang, 2009). She has been a visiting scholar in different universities such as: Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo (UASD, 2015), University of Nottingham, Malaysia campus (2015), University of British Columbia and University of Montréal (2014), Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada, 2012), University of South Africa, UNISA (Pretoria, South Africa, 2012), University of Anahuac Mayad (Mérida, Mexico, 2008), University of Kwazulu-Natal (Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, 2006), and Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia, 2005). She has presented papers in international congresses all over the world.

 

This is the full list of all the diverse seminars Professor Lirola will lead during her stay at Middlesex – all part of the Language & Communication Research Seminars series. Everyone is welcome!

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.

Video recording of James Kenworth’s talk on Reimagining Orwell for Austerity Britain

If you’ve missed, or you want to watch again the presentation by playwright and Middlesex lecturer in Media Narrative James Kenworth on his play ‘Revolution Farm’, please follow these links:

For the full talk, click here.

For a three-minute outtake, click here.

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Video recording of Jenny Cheshire’s talk at Middlesex

We were absolutely delighted to welcome at Middlesex University last December the internationally renowned sociolinguist and Professor at Queen Mary University of London, Jenny Cheshire, for a fascinating and really engaging presentation on new youth language in London and Paris.

If you’ve missed it, here’s a teaser and the full videorecording of the presentation.

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For more information on the talk click here.

And of course, check our exciting upcoming Language & Communication research Seminars for 2018!

The long stories of short tales: genes, languages and the evolution of folk traditions (new date)

The Language and Communication Research cluster is delighted to welcome the acclaimed anthropologist Dr Jamie Tehrani (Durham University) for a presentation on the long stories of short tales: genes, languages and the evolution of folk traditions.

When? Tuesday 30th January 2018, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room CG83 (College building), Middlesex University, Hendon campus

Many fairy tales are believed to be derived from oral folk traditions, some of which exhibit remarkable continuities across cultures. Versions of Cinderella and Little Red Riding Hood – to take two famous examples – have been recorded in places as diverse as Italy, England, China and Antigua. The question of when and where these so-called “international tale types” originated and how they spread is one that has preoccupied folkorists since the time of the Brothers Grimm. In this talk I will show how some answers can be gleaned by integrating cross-cultural patterns in folktales with data from population genetics and historical linguistics. I will also discuss some of the cultural and psychological properties that might make certain kinds of stories particularly “catchy” and memorable, enabling them to survive the wear-and-tear of oral transmission over so many generations and across such vast distances.

Biography

Jamie Tehrany’s research focuses on how culture evolves as it gets transmitted from person to person and from generation to generation. He is interested in understanding what makes some things catch on, others die out, and how these processes shape patterns of cultural diversity within and across populations. Dr Tehrany was trained in Social Anthropology at the London School of Economics (1995 – 1999) and gained a Master’s degree in Human Evolution and Behaviour at University College London (2000). He remained at UCL to study for a PhD in Anthropology (2005), writing his thesis on the transmission of craft traditions in Iranian tribal groups. In 2006 he took up a postdoctoral research fellowship at the AHRC Centre for the Evolution of Cultural Diversity (CECD) at University College London, before joining Durham in 2007 as a RCUK Fellow, where he was appointed as a Lecturer in Anthropology in 2012, and then Senior Lecturer in 2014. His current work focuses mainly on the transmission of popular narratives, such as traditional folktales, urban legends and modern day conspiracy theories.

This presentation was originally planned for last November but had to be rescheduled due to unforeseen circumstances.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

For a full list of all 2018 seminars, click here.

“Four legs badass, two legs wasteman!”: Reimagining Orwell for Austerity Britain

The Language and Communication Research cluster is delighted to announce the presentation by playwright and Middlesex lecturer in Media Narrative James Kenworth on his play ‘Revolution Farm’.

When? Wednesday 24  January 2018, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room C136 (College Building), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

*Please note change in room number*

Revolution-Farm-5In 2014, James was given special permission by AM heath Agents on behalf of the George Orwell estate to adapt and modernise Orwell’s classic satire, Animal Farm, and give it a fresh, contemporary twist, injecting its timeless tale of a revolution that went wrong with a gritty, urban, ‘in-yer-face’ language.

The play was unique in another respect: it was staged on one of London’s longest established and largest inner city farms: Newham City Farm, home to a large collection of farmyard favourites such as cows, horses and sheep.

In this presentation, James will explore the process/methodology of adapting a literary classic with a contemporary spin, with special emphasis on a creative and expressive approach to playwriting language/dialogue. The paper will also address the challenges of setting the play on an inner city farm and how the use of non-conventional theatre spaces affects and reconfigures the relationship between a play and audience.

Biography

imageJames Kenworth is a Playwright and a Lecturer in Media Narrative at Middlesex University. His writing include ‘verse-prose’ plays Johnny Song, Gob; black comedy Polar Bears; issue-led plays Everybody’s World (Elder Abuse), Dementia’s Journey (Dementia); plays for young people/schools The Last Story in the World; and a Newham-based trilogy of site-specific plays, When Chaplin Met Gandhi, Revolution Farm and A Splotch of Red: Keir Hardie in West Ham.

His play, Dementia’s Journey, won the 2015 University of Stirling International Dementia Award in the category: Dementia & the Arts. When Chaplin Met Gandhi and Revolution Farm is published by TSL Publications. A Splotch of Red has recently been published in a collection of political plays by Workable Press, a new publishing imprint dedicated to trade unions and organised workers.

He has extensive experience of planning, preparing and teaching playwriting and creative writing programmes/workshops for a wide variety of age groups and learners including children, young people, students and adult learners. He has worked on a regular basis on the delivery of these programmes with leading arts and educational organisations such as Spread The Word, Cardboard Citizens, Workers Educational Association University, Newham Adult Learning Service, Newham Libraries, Newham College, Community Links, Soho Theatre, University of East London and Middlesex University.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018 Language & Communication research seminars.

Language innovation and language change: taking the longer view

We are absolutely delighted to welcome the internationally renowned sociolinguist and Professor at Queen Mary University of London, Jenny Cheshire, for a presentation on new youth language in London and Paris.

When? Wednesday 6 December 2017, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room BG09A (Building 9), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Recent patterns of immigration have had different linguistic outcomes in the cities of Europe. In this talk Jenny considers two such different outcomes. ‘Multicultural London English’ (MLE) is a variable repertoire of core innovative forms of English (including, for example, a new pronoun (it’s her personality man’s looking at) and a new quotative (this is me “why you doing that for?”) heard in many multilingual areas of London. For many speakers MLE is the usual vernacular style of speaking, while for others it is a style that they adopt from time to time in order to sound ‘street cool’. Monolingual young Londoners as well as their bilingual friends all use the innovations, though their use is spearheaded by the bilingual speakers. Our research in multilingual areas of Paris replicated the London research but, in contrast to London, found very few linguistic innovations.

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In this talk Jenny will consider why young people in multilingual areas of Paris are less linguistically innovative than young people in similar areas of London. She will argue that, in general, increased mobility increases linguistic variation and linguistic change, but the extent to which the variation is innovative is determined by what Dell Hymes termed ‘the longer view’: the political, social and cultural context. Nonetheless, looking at the interactions of individual speakers in both London and Paris shows that young people use linguistic variation to accomplish similar interactional and interpersonal goals, whatever the larger scale sociocultural and political context.

Biography

Jenny Cheshire is Professor of Linguistics at Queen Mary, University of London. She Jenny-Cheshireworks on different aspects of language variation and change. She has received numerous research awards recognising her significant contributions to the field of sociolinguistics, including Multicultural London English. Her recent projects have analysed language innovation in multicultural London, and language change in multicultural Paris, especially syntactic and discourse-pragmatic change. She is also interested in developing educational resources for studying language variation and change. She has written over ten books and 90 articles in peer-reviewed international research journals and edited collections. For a list of selected publications, see http://jennycheshire.com/publications. Jenny is currently editor-in-chief of the journal Language in Society and a Fellow of the British Academy.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.