English Education in Japan

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO INVITE YOU TO A PRESENTATION BY SHINO SHIRAMA (MIDDLESEX), ON THE ENGLISH EDUCATION SYSTEM IN JAPAN.

When? Friday 23rd November 2018, 14.30 – 15.30

Where? Room V105, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Abstract:

My research project is to explore the role and characteristics of supplementary schools overseas. I have been researching how Japanese children learn English and maintain Japanese at a supplementary school in London. Most of my pupils will return to Japan after several years’ stay in London as they come here due to parents’ business. They are called ‘kikokushijo’ in Japanese. Their existence could challenge a stereotype of Japanese, which is they are not good at English.

I will discuss English Education in Japan and the role of supplementary schools to help such children-kikokushijo.

My bio:

My name is Shino Shirama from Japan. I am a second year Mphil/PhD student at Middlesex University, supervised by Leena Robertson and Anna Charalambidou.

I set up my own supplementary school in North London in 2014 to support Japanese and dual heritage children. Currently I have been engaging in researching and teaching such children and parents.

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.

A-level English reform and English at University

In the 2018 University English meeting, Billy Clark and Andrea Macrae discussed academics’ perceptions and awareness of A-level English reform. The survey, funded by the British Academy and Leverhulme, was conducted  by the ‘Integrating English‘ dream team: Andrea, Billy, and Marcello Giovanelli. You can find a visualisation of their findings here.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, English subject leaders feel that they and their teaching staff are little informed about changes to A-levels. In fact, the overwhelming majority of English degrees in the UK are making no (55%) or minor (33%)  changes changes to the curriculum to support the transition of students who are taking the reformed A-Levels.

Professor Billy Clark at the Heads of Department & Subject Leaders’ Networking Day (13th April), University of Lancaster

On a more positive note, the Lang/Lit A-level is more positively viewed in Higher Education than in schools. 95% of university English subject leaders perceive it as useful in preparing students for English degree programmes. In fact, this is tallies with our own anecdotal evidence. A couple of days ago, at a local college visit, the Lang/Lit teacher was telling how the English Literature A-Level still carries much more prestige and is more popular with staff and pupils than the Lang/Lit A-Level.

And finally, a third of English degrees do not require any of the three English A-Levels (English Language, English Literature and English Lang/Lit). It looks like we are not that unique at Middlesex!

So what can we do in higher education to help the transition of our students from secondary to tertiary education?

Billy explained the importance of connecting with secondary teachers and students, awarding bodies, even our PGCE colleagues. He also showed the importance of helping first-year undergraduate students understand how university work differs from school-level work.

Jenny Stevens (Teacher of English and freelance writer and editor) presenting the post-16 perspective on English teaching and learning suggested that HE sector can help by:

  • Getting  involved in GCSE & A Level qualification;
  • Communicating with A-level student, parents and teachers via university website (podcasts/screencasts);
  • Cross sector collaborations on social media (e.g. linking with Centre for English & Media);
  • Joining the English Association Secondary Education Committee.

“No one talks like that. Sorry”: video-recording of Jane Hodson’s presentation

A couple of weeks ago the Language and Communication Research cluster welcomed distinguished linguist and literary scholar Professor Jane Hodson (University of Sheffield) for a presentation on what people are doing when they discuss the representation of accents in film and television.

Here’s a one-minute teaser of Jane’s fascinating talk.

And here’s the entire presentation!

hod

The lighting is not fantastic. Sorry. But the presentation well worth watching.

Happy watching!