The Book of Witches

Dedicated to every woman or person who has suffered persecution or demonization for who they are.” 

A group of researchers from Middlesex University, working with prize-winning creative writers from the north-west, have produced this exciting new book that explores the history of witches in the UK, and what it is to be part of marginalised groups in today’s world. 

The Witch of Endor in the Bible is very far from being a negative figure, so why then have women and others been persecuted for witchcraft in the UK for centuries?’ Dr Adam Dalton-West provides us with answers in a gripping introduction. 

Learn how the tradition of witchcraft is still alive and well in the UK’s south-west, find out the truth behind the Pendle Witch Trials, discover just why Henry VIII was the first to outlaw witchcraft, and shake your head as you come to understand what drove the maniacal Witchfinder General Matthew Hopkins

With contributions from authors Adam Lively (Granta Best Young Novelist), A J Dalton (www.ajdalton.eu), and others, this collection remembers the innocent women and individuals who were cruelly sacrificed, examines how particular groups in society are still persecuted, and shows how society and relationships might still be magically transformed

Available from Amazon and other book outlets from 7 August 2020. Order your copy today. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Book-Witches-J-Dalton-ebook/dp/B08F5K8FM8/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=book+of+witches+dalton&qid=1598516130&sr=8-1 

BA English student profile: Claire Cusack

Claire Cusack  is a 2020 BA English graduate from Middlesex University and winner of the Dean’s Award for Best Independent Project in English.

Claire Cusack

“Studying BA English at Middlesex was a great experience and one that allowed me to grow immensely as a writer. Over the past 3 years I have learnt new skills that have helped me to enrich my creative pieces and become a more confident writer.

My third year at Middlesex especially helped me hone in on the skills I have learnt as my final project was a 5,000 word piece of creative writing. After putting a lot of time and effort into finishing the piece and therefore completing my studies, I feel satisfied knowing that I have done my absolute best and can take what I have learnt and use it in whatever career path I end up taking.”

Read Claire’s award-winning crime-fiction that she developed for her final year Independent Project, featuring detective Jennifer.

‘On the Chase’

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The meeting room fell silent when the retrieved footage appeared on the screen and showed the robber at work. Covered from head to toe in all black protective gear and a motorbike helmet, the individual opened the money vault, having punched the numbers in without hesitation. They strolled away confidently. Hips swayed. A woman? She departed with two gym bags filled with cash.

Continue reading “BA English student profile: Claire Cusack”

Footage of Crime Fiction in the Archives: Hunting for Hammett

We were delighted to host crime novelist and senior lecturer Dr Andrew Pepper (Queen’s University Belfast)  last month for a presentation on Crime Fiction in the Archives: Hunting for Hammett.

Andrew discussed what the “official” archive held by the University of South Carolina reveals about Dashiell Hammett, and crucially about the lives and dramas of those who first tried to excavate Hammett’s story in the late 1960s and 1970s. This talk examined how biographical scholarship was conducted in the pre-digital era and what was at stake for those who sought, against the wishes of Hammett’s estate, to dig up the buried details of his life and works.

Below is the link to the entire presentation.

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.

Crime Fiction in the Archives: Hunting for Hammett

The Language and Communication research cluster is delighted to welcome crime novelist and senior lecturer Dr Andrew Pepper (Queen’s University Belfast)  for a presentation on Crime Fiction in the Archives: Hunting for Hammett.

When? Friday 2nd November 2018, 14.30 – 15.30

Where? Room V105, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Crime fiction is typically regarded as cheap and disposable and certainly not conducive to serious archival scholarship. In this talk, I consider what the “official” archive held by the University of South Carolina reveals about Dashiell Hammett, a figure about which much is already known. The real “discovery” is not Hammett himself, for there is little that the archive can now tell us beyond what is already known, but the lives and dramas of those who first tried to excavate Hammett’s story in the late 1960s and 1970s. This talk examines how biographical scholarship was conducted in the pre-digital era and what was at stake for those who sought, against the wishes of Hammett’s estate, to dig up the buried details of his life and works. Its focus is not Hammett himself but the freewheeling band of “unauthorized” Hammett hunters who toiled away in the early 1970s and whose efforts typically, and in typically Hammettian fashion, ended in failure.

 

BIO:

pepperAndrew Pepper is Senior Lecturer in English at Queen’s University Belfast. He is author of Unwilling Executioner: Crime Fiction and the State (OUP 2016) and The Contemporary American Crime Novel: Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality (EUP 2000). His “Pyke” series of detective novels, set in nineteenth-century Britain and Ireland, including The Last Days of Newgate (2006) and Bloody Winter (2011), were all published by Weidenfeld and Nicolson.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.