Partnership with Unitas Youth Zone

Everyone at Middlesex University is so excited to be partnering with Unitas Youth Zone. And no-one is more excited than our BA English students who will be delivering the newly-launched homework club from 5th November 2019.

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Our 3rd year BA English students, Melissa and Shimyla, will be running the seniors homework club on Tuesday afternoons (for 13 -18 year old & up to 25 for those with disabilities) and the juniors (8-12 year olds) on Wednesday afternoons, from November 2019 to May 2020.

Barnet Youth Zone, named by young people as ‘Unitas’, is an independent charity for the borough’s young people aged 8 – 19, and up to 25 for those with disabilities.  The youth centre provides a safe environment where young people can enjoy themselves and develop skills to build confidence and raise attainment to create a happier and healthier generation.

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Middlesex partnership with Unitas aims:

  • To enable BA English Middlesex students develop skills and knowledge in teaching and mentoring and share experiences of university life;
  • To inspire young people from low-income families to aspire to higher level learning;
  • To support them in making informed decisions post-16 and post-18;
  • To provide role models to help raise self-esteem;
  • To improve young people’s wellbeing;
  • To enhance the visibility of English as a university subject area.

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Check back at our londonenglish.live website for updates on how our English students, Melissa and Shimyla, are getting on in the new roles as homework club helpers at Unitas.

English Education in Japan

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO INVITE YOU TO A PRESENTATION BY SHINO SHIRAMA (MIDDLESEX), ON THE ENGLISH EDUCATION SYSTEM IN JAPAN.

When? Friday 23rd November 2018, 14.30 – 15.30

Where? Room V105, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Abstract:

My research project is to explore the role and characteristics of supplementary schools overseas. I have been researching how Japanese children learn English and maintain Japanese at a supplementary school in London. Most of my pupils will return to Japan after several years’ stay in London as they come here due to parents’ business. They are called ‘kikokushijo’ in Japanese. Their existence could challenge a stereotype of Japanese, which is they are not good at English.

I will discuss English Education in Japan and the role of supplementary schools to help such children-kikokushijo.

My bio:

My name is Shino Shirama from Japan. I am a second year Mphil/PhD student at Middlesex University, supervised by Leena Robertson and Anna Charalambidou.

I set up my own supplementary school in North London in 2014 to support Japanese and dual heritage children. Currently I have been engaging in researching and teaching such children and parents.

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.

Video-recording of Leena Robertson’s presentation

DqvL-U2WoAAidzZ (1)Our first Language & Communication research seminar for this year was a fascinating talk by Leena Robertson, reflecting on her, her team’s and her participants’ journey in finding names for the Romani languages used by the informants of the large ROMtels project.

Excavating naming practices in language research  methodologies: The case of Romani languages in Europe

In addition to providing a glimpse to a group of silenced and unmentioned group of languages, it raised a number of important ethical issues.

Here’s a brief teaser to the presentation:

 

And here is the link to the entire presentation:

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.

Excavating naming practices in language research  methodologies: The case of Romani languages in Europe

The Language and Communication research cluster is delighted to announce a presentation by our colleague and Associate Professor in Education, Dr Leena Robertson, on excavating naming practices in language research  methodologies: The case of Romani languages in Europe.

When? Friday 19th October 2018, 14.30 – 15.30

Where? Room V105, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

This presentation draws on a European Union (EU) funded research study (more details can be found here https://research.ncl.ac.uk/romtels/) in which the Roma research participants identified their language as ‘our gypsy language’. The process of finding names for their Romani varieties more specifically – and more ‘accurately’ and ‘formally’ – opened up new and unexpected situations. The research team’s firm and clearly acknowledged starting point had included a recognition that language names are never politically innocent or neutral, and the names of languages and linguistic varieties have always been dependent on who is doing the naming, and for what purpose, and whose purpose, and whether the naming is done by an insider or an outsider, from an emic (insider) or an etic (outsider)  perspective (Headland et al, 1991).

It is language names and naming practices that are excavated here in an on-going quest for developing more socially just methodologies. In the case of Roma people and with reference to their various Romani language names, they are a source of information of the Roma past and the various Roma groups’ routes of migration (Matras, 2005), and of social exclusion and marginalisation (Danaher, 2013; Fleck and Rughinis, 2008). Importantly, they also reveal Roma people’s agency and attempts to resist marginalisation (Danaher, 2013). One of the key findings concerned the participants’ investigation of both emic and etic naming practices of their own language – switching from emic to etic – which promoted emancipation.

Bio

LeenaRobertson

Leena Robertson is Associate Professor in the department of Education at Middlesex University, London. Leena’s work, research and publications are in the field of multilingualism, literacies, culture and learning. She has extensive experience of teaching multilingual children in schools, and working with families and community teachers. For many years she led teacher education programmes and mentored teachers and student teachers in London schools. Leena has led a network of early years teachers in Finland and Estonia in developing child-initiated pedagogies. Her latest work concerns translanguaging, Roma children and their families, and she remains committed in developing pedagogies and practices that foster social justice. Originally from Finland, Leena enjoys swimming in open seas, and in all seasons, and spending time with her family and friends.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.