The Multimodal Writer

 

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE A PRESENTATION BY award-winning author of theory, fiction and creative non-fiction, Dr Josie Barnard on how can a writer optimise his or her ability to move between genres and technologies.

When? Thursday, 12th March 2020, 15.00-16.00

Where? Room CG09 (College building), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

9781137607911

These are exciting times for creative writing. In our digital age, the ability to move between types of writing and technologies – often at speed – is increasingly essential for writers. Yet, such flexibility can be difficult to achieve, and, how to develop it remains a pressing challenge. Josie Barnard’s academic research has at the centre one question: how can a writer optimise his or her ability to move between genres and technologies? Her new book  The Multimodal Writer sets out to provide theoretical background and serve as a practical tool to help writers face challenges and embrace opportunities presented by new media technologies robustly, effectively, and with pleasure.

 

Biographical note:

IMG_7293-768x512Dr. Josie Barnard SFHEA is an award-winning author of theory, fiction and creative non-fiction whose academic research centres on the application of creativity to the challenge of bridging the digital divide.  Her research into digital literacy is represented by her Macmillan International Higher Education monograph The Multimodal Writer: Creative Writing Across Genres and Media (2019). Her research into digital inclusion is represented by her BBC Radio 4 programme, Digital Future: the New Underclass (2019).  She has developed an empirically tested pedagogical model for teaching digital literacy.  The author of six books, including the Betty Trask award-winning Poker Face (1996) and extensive print and broadcast journalism and international academic articles and chapters, Josie is currently co-editing a Multimodal Writing Special Issue of the National Association of Writers in Education journal Writing in Practice (2021).  She collaborates with government departments and other key stakeholder groups to inform policy and develop citizens’ digital literacy.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

Reading on Screen: challenging myths and misperceptions of reading in the digital age

The Language and Communication research cluster is delighted to welcome Professor Bronwen Thomas (Bournemouth University) for a presentation on Reading on Screen: challenging myths and misperceptions of reading in the digital age.

When? Friday 8th February 2019, 14.30 – 15.30

Where? Room V105, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Debates about digital reading are beset by stereotypes such as those of the ‘digital native’, and crude binaries about print vs screen cultures.  Two projects supported by the AHRC – Researching Readers Online (2012) and The Digital Reading Network (2013-14) – set out to provide more nuanced insights into the practices of digital readers and to explore new approaches to the study of readers based on the rich data about reading available to us thanks to the digital revolution.  A third project, Reading on Screen (2017-18), employed innovative participatory methods to create over 30 digital stories reflecting the complex and often contradictory experiences of contemporary readers from a variety of social backgrounds and ages.

In this paper, I will reflect on the efficacy of the digital storytelling method for eliciting reader responses of a radically different kind to those we are accustomed to from academic studies reliant on interviews, questionnaires or textual analysis.  I will also outline the main outcomes and impact of the project, both planned and unplanned, particularly focusing on group dynamics, benefits reported by participants, and follow on activities and creative projects initiated by them.

Bronwen Thomas

BIO

Bronwen Thomas is Professor of English and New Media at Bournemouth University and Director of the Centre for the Study of Journalism, Culture and Community. She has led three AHRC funded projects on digital reading, and has published widely on new media narratives, fanfiction and online communities. Bronwen is currently writing a book on Literature and Social Media.

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.