Tag: dialect

Language innovation and language change: taking the longer view

We are absolutely delighted to welcome the internationally renowned sociolinguist and Professor at Queen Mary University of London, Jenny Cheshire, for a presentation on new youth language in London and Paris.

When? Wednesday 6 December 2017, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room BG09A (Building 9), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Recent patterns of immigration have had different linguistic outcomes in the cities of Europe. In this talk Jenny considers two such different outcomes. ‘Multicultural London English’ (MLE) is a variable repertoire of core innovative forms of English (including, for example, a new pronoun (it’s her personality man’s looking at) and a new quotative (this is me “why you doing that for?”) heard in many multilingual areas of London. For many speakers MLE is the usual vernacular style of speaking, while for others it is a style that they adopt from time to time in order to sound ‘street cool’. Monolingual young Londoners as well as their bilingual friends all use the innovations, though their use is spearheaded by the bilingual speakers. Our research in multilingual areas of Paris replicated the London research but, in contrast to London, found very few linguistic innovations.

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In this talk Jenny will consider why young people in multilingual areas of Paris are less linguistically innovative than young people in similar areas of London. She will argue that, in general, increased mobility increases linguistic variation and linguistic change, but the extent to which the variation is innovative is determined by what Dell Hymes termed ‘the longer view’: the political, social and cultural context. Nonetheless, looking at the interactions of individual speakers in both London and Paris shows that young people use linguistic variation to accomplish similar interactional and interpersonal goals, whatever the larger scale sociocultural and political context.

Biography

Jenny Cheshire is Professor of Linguistics at Queen Mary, University of London. She Jenny-Cheshireworks on different aspects of language variation and change. She has received numerous research awards recognising her significant contributions to the field of sociolinguistics, including Multicultural London English. Her recent projects have analysed language innovation in multicultural London, and language change in multicultural Paris, especially syntactic and discourse-pragmatic change. She is also interested in developing educational resources for studying language variation and change. She has written over ten books and 90 articles in peer-reviewed international research journals and edited collections. For a list of selected publications, see http://jennycheshire.com/publications. Jenny is currently editor-in-chief of the journal Language in Society and a Fellow of the British Academy.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Dialect and Heritage – project to update the historic ‘Survey of English Dialects’ (SED)

We talked in class about the ‘Survey of English Dialects’ (SED). There are some exciting news about a new dialect project to update this most comprehensive survey of dialects in England and open its records to the public. The project has just received a £798,000 National Lottery to continue the work of the Survey of English Dialects, under the direction of Dr Fiona Douglas, University of Leeds.

This story has been picked up by a number of newspapers in the past few days (thank you to Dr Maggie Scott for pointing it out) including:

Happy reading!

 

 “No one talks like that. Sorry”: What are people doing when they discuss accents in film and television?

The Language and Communication Research cluster is delighted to welcome the distinguished linguist and literary scholar Professor Jane Hodson (University of Sheffield) for a presentation on what people are doing when they discuss the representation of accents in film and television.

When? Wednesday 7 February 2018, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room BG09A (Building 9), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

In an influential chapter, Rosina Lippi-Green explores the representation of different accents of English in animated Disney films. She finds a repeated pattern where “characters with strongly negative actions and motivations often speak varieties of English linked to specific geographical regions and marginalized groups” (1997: 80). This, she argues, serves to establish and disseminate stereotypes of specific linguistic groups to children. Lippi-Green herself does not attempt to investigate the uptake of these stereotypes among film viewers, but some recent work has begun to investigate the ways in which viewers respond to the representation of different language varieties in film, often using the comments thread on YouTube videos as data (see for example Androutsopoulos 2013 and Cecelia Cutler 2016).

book
Jane Hodson’s 2014 monograph Dialect in Literature and Film

In this paper, I attempt to build on this work by focusing on the question of what people are doing when they discuss the representation of language varieties. To do this, I draw on three different sets of data: online discussions of film and television accents, a project where I recorded an undergraduate seminar on language variation in literature, and an experiment conducted in collaboration with a student where we manipulated the voices associated with animated characters and elicited responses from participants. I conclude that these data sets suggest that people are often performing highly complex acts when they discuss the representation of accent. At the same time, however, I think about whether or not these explicit discussions are rather different in nature from what people do when they simply watch film and television, and I ask if the findings from such studies get us any closer to understanding the effect of linguistic stereotyping in film.

Biography

HodsonJane Hodson is Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Sheffield. Her research interests lie at the interface of language and literature, and she is particularly concerned with the way in which style is contested at an ideological level. Her current area of research is the representation of dialect in English literature. In 2013 she completed the AHRC-funded project `Dialect in British Fiction 1800-1836‘. Her monograph, Dialect in Literature and Film, was published with Palgrave Macmillan in 2014. She edited a collection Dialect and Literature in the Long Nineteenth Century, which was published by Routledge in 2017.  She has an ongoing interest in the way in which Yorkshire English has been represented in film and literature over the past 200 years and has worked with a number of artists, poets, schools and archives on projects to engage the wider public with this work.

References

Androutsopoulos, Jannis. 2013 Participatory Culture and Metalinguistic Discourse: Performing and Negotiating German Dialects on YouTube. In: D. Tannen & AM Trester (eds.) Discourse 2.0. Language and New Media , 47-71. Washingtoin, DC: Georgetown University Press.

Cecelia Cutler. 2016. “ Ets jast ma booooooooooooo ” : Social meanings of Scottish accents on YouTube. In: Lauren Squires (ed.)  English in Computer-Mediated Communication : Variation, Representation, and Change, 69-98. De Gruyter. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Lippi-Green, Rosina. 1997. English with an Accent: Language, Ideology and Discrimination in the United States. London: Routledge.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.