Tag: authors

A Viewpoint is more than a Point of View: ‘Shades of Light’ and City Poetry

The Language and Communication Research cluster is delighted to welcome the acclaimed poet Mary Coghill for a poetry reading/presentation on A Viewpoint is more than a Point of View: ‘Shades of Light’ and City Poetry.

When? Wednesday 14 February 2018, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room TBC, Middlesex University, Hendon campus

For this poet, the definition of what might be called a ‘city poetic’ is ongoing.  The understanding of a viewpoint – from what angle the poet sees what is going on around him or her – is central.  The focused use of techniques and imagery which are sympathetic to the demands made by the city environment on those who live in the city day by day, night by night, is also crucial.  This presentation will examine, both through the examination of poetic theory and with examples from Shades of Light, how some of these issues are represented and interpreted, including through the use of Adobe Indesign software.

20130022111658img01Biography: Dr Mary Coghill

Creative Writing MA Plymouth University (2005) which included the narrative poem Designed to Fade (2006) Shearsman Books.

Creative Writing PhD from The London Metropolitan University (2011) with Professor Paul Cobley as Director of Studies: ‘A Theory and Praxis of a City Poetic: Jakobson, Poetic Function and City Space; Women, Deixis and the Narrator: A City Poem: ‘Shades of Light: A Triumph of City’; poem published (2012) www.cityofpoetry.co.uk

Visiting Research Fellowship at the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Studies, University of London (2014-17) included Assay of Blood and Gold: London (2017) www.cityofpoetry.co.uk and theoretical work on Jakobson and Metonymy.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Language and Communication Research Seminars 2017-18

We are beyond excited to announce the line-up of speakers for our 2017-18 Language and Communication Research Seminars at our Hendon Campus:

mdx

Term 1:

Term 2:

 

Further information about the presentations, including room numbers, titles and abstracts will be published soon.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Marlowe, Shakespeare, Authors and Speech Recognition

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The news that Marlowe is to be credited as a co-author for some of Shakespeare’s plays is big news, of course. It’s fascinating to think about how long debates have been going on about authorship of Shakespeare’s and other plays (e.g. Arden of Faversham, which is now being credited partly to Shakespeare). It seems we really do care about who produced the plays and not just about the plays themselves, even though there are, of course, lots of different views about the relative importance of texts, authors, contexts, readers, etc.

I’m also a bit amazed that linguistic evidence has been used to determine this, as there was a time when it seemed to be largely overlooked, despite what looked to me like some fairly clear evidence it provided, e.g. in the work of Jonathan Hope

Meanwhile, linguists are most excited about the news that an automated speech recognition system has achieved parity with human transcribers. I find this far more amazing. I remember John Wells explaining some of the difficulties which made it seem very unlikely that machines could ever come close to humans in this. It is amazing that they can now perform so well. Here’s Geoff Pullum commenting on it in response to the Language Log post:

geoffpullum_comment

I think my favourite speculation on who wrote Shakespeare’s plays was a story in 2000AD in which the plays were written by a time-travelling scholar from the future who travelled back in time to find out who wrote them, panicked when there was no sign of Shakespeare in Elizabethan England, and wrote them himself to make sure future generations wouldn’t miss out