Creative Arts Showcase and Launch of Haringey Unchained Creative Magazine

We are very excited to invite you to the launch show of ‘Haringey Unchained‘, the creative magazine  and blog that resulted from the intense collaboration of English students (and staff) at Middlesex University and Haringey Sixth Form College.

 

Creative Arts Showcase and Launch of Haringey Unchained Creative Magazinehar

When? Thursday 5th July,  6.30 – 8.00 pm

Where? Haringey Sixth Form College theatre, N17 8HR

Featuring dance performances from Duke’s Aldridge Academy and Gladesmore School Y8 -11

This will be a celebration of London’s creative talent; Middlesex and Haringey students will read out their work and dancers from the WeMove Dance Leadership project will provide interpretative dances of the magazine’s prose and poetry pieces.

 

An additional opportunity to hear readings from Haringey Unchained is:

Haringey Sixth Form Art Show, Private View
When? Friday 6th July, 4pm -6pm

Where? Alexandra Palace, Transmitter Hall, N22 7AY

Featuring readings from Haringey Unchained and dance performances from Gladesmore School Y8srenisha_sun-blind.jpg

We hope to see you at these exciting arts productions and enjoy and creative and thoughtful work of young people in North London.

 

Launch show of Haringey Unchained magazine

We are very excited to announce the launch show of ‘Haringey Unchained‘ the creative magazine that was co-produced this year through the intense collaboration of students (and staff) at Haringey Sixth Form College and Middlesex University.
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The launch show for this year’s issue of the magazine will be on Thursday 5th July, in the evening, at Haringey Sixth Form College in Tottenham in London. This will be a celebration of London’s creative talent; writers will read out their work and dancers from the WeMove Dance Leadership project will provide interpretative dances of the magazine’s prose and poetry pieces.

There will also be an Art Exhibition at the iconic North London venue, Alexandra Palace, on the 6th July, also in the evening – and there will be additional opportunities to attend readings of the Haringey Unchained collection.

‘Haringey Unchained’ hot off the press

We had our final editorial meeting on May 3rd, 2018 for this year’s issue of Haringey Unchained. We finalised the flat plan, decided on the amazing cover design, and are really excited about the upcoming publication.

To visit the updated blog, where all submissions have been posted in full, go to: www.haringeyunchained.com  

The magazine will be launched in a series of events in late June, culminating in the official launch at July 5th, 2018 at Haringey Sixth Form Centre. We will announce more details soon.Haringey Unchained LogoThis is the part of the introductory section of the magazine:

Haringey Unchained is a collective of students aiming to showcase the creative talent of Haringey Sixth Form College in Tottenham, London. Our community has had a challenging academic year, but amidst the setbacks, our students and staff have continued to produce art and creative writing that shows a want to be heard. In this magazine, we aim to bring out the critical and creative consciousness of a vibrant college. This creative gives space to those whose work might otherwise not be seen or read.

Since the cuffs are off, we are able to express ourselves through our photography, art, short fiction and poetry, to express what is really on our minds. We are free.

This year, we were privileged to work alongside Middlesex University in London, whose editorial team brought together an exciting range of submissions. We had editorial meetings together during which the students collaborated on the concepts for the magazine and blog.

Submissions were produced by Haringey Unchained’s current members, Haringey Unchained alumni, Middlesex University English and Creative Writing students and Haringey Sixth Form College students and staff.

Editorial Team20180503_165137.jpg

The Haringey Unchained Editorial Team comprises ten Haringey College students and is headed by Angie Smith, English Teacher at Haringey Sixth Form Centre and Founder of Haringey Unchained. It also includes five Middlesex members (for 2017-18); our four Middlesex BA English students: Yvonne Alexander-Taylor, Majeda Reema Begum, Sarah Haque, Teodora Matković and myself (Anna Charalambidou).

 

 

A-level English reform and English at University

In the 2018 University English meeting, Billy Clark and Andrea Macrae discussed academics’ perceptions and awareness of A-level English reform. The survey, funded by the British Academy and Leverhulme, was conducted  by the ‘Integrating English‘ dream team: Andrea, Billy, and Marcello Giovanelli. You can find a visualisation of their findings here.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, English subject leaders feel that they and their teaching staff are little informed about changes to A-levels. In fact, the overwhelming majority of English degrees in the UK are making no (55%) or minor (33%)  changes changes to the curriculum to support the transition of students who are taking the reformed A-Levels.

Professor Billy Clark at the Heads of Department & Subject Leaders’ Networking Day (13th April), University of Lancaster

On a more positive note, the Lang/Lit A-level is more positively viewed in Higher Education than in schools. 95% of university English subject leaders perceive it as useful in preparing students for English degree programmes. In fact, this is tallies with our own anecdotal evidence. A couple of days ago, at a local college visit, the Lang/Lit teacher was telling how the English Literature A-Level still carries much more prestige and is more popular with staff and pupils than the Lang/Lit A-Level.

And finally, a third of English degrees do not require any of the three English A-Levels (English Language, English Literature and English Lang/Lit). It looks like we are not that unique at Middlesex!

So what can we do in higher education to help the transition of our students from secondary to tertiary education?

Billy explained the importance of connecting with secondary teachers and students, awarding bodies, even our PGCE colleagues. He also showed the importance of helping first-year undergraduate students understand how university work differs from school-level work.

Jenny Stevens (Teacher of English and freelance writer and editor) presenting the post-16 perspective on English teaching and learning suggested that HE sector can help by:

  • Getting  involved in GCSE & A Level qualification;
  • Communicating with A-level student, parents and teachers via university website (podcasts/screencasts);
  • Cross sector collaborations on social media (e.g. linking with Centre for English & Media);
  • Joining the English Association Secondary Education Committee.

New Partnership with Haringey Unchained

We are absolutely delighted to be the 2017-18 University partner of the Haringey Unchained. Haringey Unchained is a collective of students aiming to showcase the creative talent of Haringey Sixth Form Centre in Tottenham, London.

This collective publishes a volume of creative writing every year. Below is their 2017 collection, in collaboration with the University of Warwick.

har-e1499187201698.jpg

The collection is a great read and was launched on June 22nd, at  the final show of the Haringey Unchained and We Move Creative Arts Festival. Poetry readings were combined with dance performances inspired by the poems in the collection. Industry experts in the audience enjoyed the show as much as we did.

To find more about the work of Haringey Unchained check their website: https://haringeyunchained.wordpress.com/

We are really looking forward to working with students and staff at Haringey Sixth Form College. Our Middlesex students at BA English will work with and mentor Haringey students in editing volume 3 of Haringey Unchained.

All submissions welcome!

Day schedule for Symposium on Close Reading

The full schedule for the day symposium on Close Reading, Codes and Interpretation is now confirmed:

MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

Room H116 (Hatchcroft building)

13 June 2017

0900 – 0930 Registration

0930 – 1015 PAUL COBLEY (Middlesex University)
‘The magic of codes: semiotics and close reading’
1015-1100 BARBARA BLEIMAN (English and Media Centre)
‘Close reading in Secondary English – practices, problems and solutions’

1100 – 1115 tea/coffee

1115 – 1200 ADRIAN PABLÉ (University of Hong Kong)
‘Interpretation, radical indeterminacy and close reading’
1200 – 1245 STEFAN PETO (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys)
‘Close reading at the chalk-face: strategies and observations in Key Stage 3’

1245 – 1345 Lunch & Launch of the undergraduate magazine Mesh

1345 – 1430 JON ORMAN (University of Hong Kong)
‘Thick description and/as close reading: some language-philosophical reflections’
1430 – 1515 BILLY CLARK (Middlesex University)
‘Pragmatic inference and reading processes’
1515 – 1600 MARCELLO GIOVANELLI (Aston University) and JESS MASON (Sheffield Hallam University)
‘Whose close reading?: emphasis, attention and cognition in the literature classroom’

1600 -1615 tea/coffee

1615 – 1700 ANDREA MACRAE (Oxford Brookes University)
‘Close reading as process and product’
1700 – 1745 LOUISA ENSTONE (Darrickwood School)
‘Is it time to stop pee-ing? A grassroots study into teaching reading and essay writing at Secondary’
1745 – 1800 JOHAN SIEBERS (Middlesex University)
‘Only the furthest distance would be closeness – semantic anarchism, close reading and academic practice’

1800 – 1900 Book launch: Critical Humanist Perspectives: The Integrational Turn in Philosophy of Language and Communication, edited by Adrian Pablé (Routledge, 2017).

For more information, and to register click here.

‘Close reading, codes and interpretation’ – booking open and line-up confirmed

ooking to our one-day symposium on ‘Close reading, codes and interpretation’, hosted by the Language & Communication is now open.

book message cloud shape Book here.

When? 9 am-7 pm, Tuesday 13th June 2017
Where?
Room H116, Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, London, NW4 4BT

In some reckonings, ‘close reading’ is now around 90 years old, having been inaugurated in I. A. Richards’ Principles of Literary Criticism (1926) and Practical Criticism (1929). The close reading of texts has become arguably the central activity of the humanities and close reading is carried out across different levels of education and through a number of disciplines. As its practitioners recognize, procedures of close reading can become ossified into routine practices of code identification rather than active interpretation.

This day symposium seeks to ask what ‘close reading’ is like now, how it is exercised in education in different contexts and how it might differ from or resemble ‘codes’ of reading. It features papers by teachers in Higher Education, Further Education and Secondary Education, including:

  • BARBARA BLEIMAN (English and Media Centre): ‘Close reading in Secondary English –  practices, problems and solutions’
  • BILLY CLARK (Middlesex University): ‘Pragmatic inference and reading processes’
  • PAUL COBLEY (Middlesex University): ‘The magic of codes: semiotics and close reading’
  • LOUISA ENSTONE (Darrickwood School): ‘Is it time to stop pee-ing? A grassroots study into teaching reading and essay writing at Secondary’
  • MARCELLO GIOVANELLI (Aston University) and JESS MASON (Sheffield Hallam University): ‘Whose close reading?: emphasis, attention and cognition in the literature classroom’
  • ANDREA MACRAE (Oxford Brookes University): ‘Close reading as process and product’
  • JON ORMAN (University of Hong Kong): ‘Thick description and/as close reading: some language-philosophical reflections’
  • ADRIAN PABLÉ (University of Hong Kong): ‘Interpretation, radical indeterminacy and close reading’
  • STEFAN PETO (Simon Langton Grammar School for Boys): ‘Close reading at the chalk-face: strategies and observations in Key Stage 3’
  • JOHAN SIEBERS (Middlesex University): ‘Only the furthest distance would be closeness – semantic anarchism, close reading and academic practice’what-reading

Cost: £10 flat fee (includes lunch and refreshments)

For the full day schedule, click here.

For any questions, please email Billy Clark b.clark@mdx.ac.uk or Paul Cobley p.cobley@mdx.ac.uk