Symposium on Close Reading in Education: 13th June 2017

The Language and Communication Research Cluster is pleased to announce its upcoming whole-day symposium on Close reading, codes and interpretation.

In some reckonings, ‘close reading’ is now around 90 years old, having been inaugurated in I. A. Richards’ Principles of Literary Criticism (1926) and Practical Criticism (1929). The close reading of texts has become arguably the central activity of the humanities and close reading is carried out across different levels of education and through a number of disciplines. As its practitioners recognize, procedures of close reading can become ossified into routine practices of code identification rather than active interpretation. This symposium seeks to ask what ‘close reading’ is like now, how it is exercised in education at different levels and how it might differ from or resemble ‘codes’ of reading.

The symposium will include presentations from academics as well as teachers in secondary education.what-reading

When? 9 am- 7 pm, Tuesday 13th June 2017

Where? Middlesex University, Hendon Campus, London, NW4 4BT

The day will also include the launch of the undergraduate magazine Mesh and of the volume Critical Humanist Perspectives: The Integrational Turn in Philosophy of Language and Communication, edited by Adrian Pablé (Routledge, 2017).

More information and a full day schedule to follow.

Polysemous Words: Meaning and Pragmatics

Professor Robyn Carston from UCL discusses how multiple senses for a word arise in communication at an upcoming Language and Communication Research Seminar.

Date: Thursday 9th February 2017

Time: 15.00-16.00

Location: Room C127, College Building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BTRed_Mouth_PNG_Clipart_Image-321.png

Most words are ‘polysemous’, that is, they can be used to express a range of semantically-related senses. E.g., the word ‘mouth’ can refer to just the outside part (Wipe your mouth), just the inside (Her mouth was dry from nervousness), to the entrance of a cave, to the part of a river that enters into an ocean; to a whole person (I have four mouths to feed), to someone who talks too much (big mouth), among numerous others.

In this talk, Professor Robyn Carston will discuss how multiple senses for a word arise in communication (via pragmatic processes) and what, if any, the core meaning is from which the other senses are derived.

Biography

Robyn Carston is Professor of Linguistics at University College London and Senior Researcher at the Centre for the Study of Mind in Nature, Oslo.  Her work on language and communication is strongly interdisciplinary, integrating ideas from linguistics, philosophy of language and cognitive science.  Her research areas include the semantics/pragmatics distinction, explicit and implicit communication, relevance theory, non-literal uses of language, and the nature of word meaning.  Her publications include the widely cited monograph Thoughts and Utterances (2002, Blackwell); she is currently working on a collection of papers, Pragmatics and Semantic Content, to be published by Oxford University Press.

Other upcoming Language and Communication Research Seminars include (all Thursdays 3-4 pm):

**Please note that the talk by Federico Farini originally planned for 26 January 2017 has been postponed to Thursday 9 March 2017 .**

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For more information or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Emerging Research in English

 

Yesterday we had our first ever event jointly organised by the ‘Language & Communication’ and ‘Promotional Cultures’ research clusters.

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Our PhD candidates talked about aspects of their ever evolving research projects. These are the titles of the presentations:

  • Salim Bouherar:  “Idiom teaching and understanding: A first language or imperial culture?”
  • Narmina Fataliyeva: “Linguistic and extra linguistic factors regulating the synonym choice in political discourse”
  • Benoît Leclercq (pictured above): “Understanding the concept of semantics in relevance theory”
  • Tatjana Milosavljevic: ”Neoliberal Britain in Black British cultural production of the 1980s”
  • Kyu Hyun Park: “Speech production in intercultural communication”
  • Ramona Pistol: “Metaphor and metarepresentation’

We could have kept discussing the projects for hours, but unfortunately had to leave the room at 5pm, as it was booked for another event. Undeterred, we continued the conversation at the beautifully decorated Atrium of the College Building.

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