CALL  FOR PAPERS: The Constructionist View of Communication: Promises and Challenges

We welcome paper for the ECREA Philosophy of Communication Section Workshop, entitled ‘The Constructionist View of Communication: Promises and Challenges’, at the Department of Philosophy, Tel Aviv University, 18-20 September, 2019.

ecrea_smallWhat is communication? There is no single answer to this fundamental question. According to the (still prevailing) transmission view, communication consists in the transfer of messages from sender to receiver. According to the constructionist perspective, on the other hand, in the processes of communication meanings are constituted, not merely transferred. This perspective has many variants (the ritual / constitutive model, use-oriented philosophical outlooks on linguistic meaning, social construction of communication approach, or systems theory – to name only a few), and is pursued (either explicitly or implicitly) by a variety of communication scholars, as well as thinkers in related fields. At the same time, communication constructionism still has its staunch opponents.

The objective of this workshop is to bring together scholars of communication studies, philosophy and neighbouring fields to explore the current faces of constructionism in communication research.

Thus we invite papers concerned with the following questions and topics, among others:

  • Theoretical developments of the constructionist position
  • Formal models of constructionism
  • Critical analyses of constructionism (or its specific variants)
  • Discussions of philosophical/theoretical perspectives on communication that embody the constructionist outlook
  • Applications of the constructionist view in particular case-studies

Please send extended abstracts (up to 400 words) to Eli Dresner, Tel Aviv University, dresner@post.tau.ac.il, by April 7, 2019. Notification of acceptance by May 5, 2019.

For more information, please visit http://philosophyofcommunication.eu

Organizing Committee:

  • Kęstas Kirtiklis, chair (Vilnius University)
  • Eli Dresner (Tel Aviv University)
  • Joana Bicacro (Lusofona University)
  • Mats Bergman (University of Helsinki)
  • Johan Siebers (Middlesex University London)
  • Lydia Sanchez (University of Barcelona)
  • Jose Gomez Pinto (Lusofona University)

 

Language innovation and language change: taking the longer view

We are absolutely delighted to welcome the internationally renowned sociolinguist and Professor at Queen Mary University of London, Jenny Cheshire, for a presentation on new youth language in London and Paris.

When? Wednesday 6 December 2017, 16.00 – 17.30

Where? Room BG09A (Building 9), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Recent patterns of immigration have had different linguistic outcomes in the cities of Europe. In this talk Jenny considers two such different outcomes. ‘Multicultural London English’ (MLE) is a variable repertoire of core innovative forms of English (including, for example, a new pronoun (it’s her personality man’s looking at) and a new quotative (this is me “why you doing that for?”) heard in many multilingual areas of London. For many speakers MLE is the usual vernacular style of speaking, while for others it is a style that they adopt from time to time in order to sound ‘street cool’. Monolingual young Londoners as well as their bilingual friends all use the innovations, though their use is spearheaded by the bilingual speakers. Our research in multilingual areas of Paris replicated the London research but, in contrast to London, found very few linguistic innovations.

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In this talk Jenny will consider why young people in multilingual areas of Paris are less linguistically innovative than young people in similar areas of London. She will argue that, in general, increased mobility increases linguistic variation and linguistic change, but the extent to which the variation is innovative is determined by what Dell Hymes termed ‘the longer view’: the political, social and cultural context. Nonetheless, looking at the interactions of individual speakers in both London and Paris shows that young people use linguistic variation to accomplish similar interactional and interpersonal goals, whatever the larger scale sociocultural and political context.

Biography

Jenny Cheshire is Professor of Linguistics at Queen Mary, University of London. She Jenny-Cheshireworks on different aspects of language variation and change. She has received numerous research awards recognising her significant contributions to the field of sociolinguistics, including Multicultural London English. Her recent projects have analysed language innovation in multicultural London, and language change in multicultural Paris, especially syntactic and discourse-pragmatic change. She is also interested in developing educational resources for studying language variation and change. She has written over ten books and 90 articles in peer-reviewed international research journals and edited collections. For a list of selected publications, see http://jennycheshire.com/publications. Jenny is currently editor-in-chief of the journal Language in Society and a Fellow of the British Academy.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.