Paint into text: the re-formation of an exhibition into a dramatic text

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE A PRESENTATION BY award-winning dramatist and director and Head of Media Department, James Martin Charlton, on the re-formation of an exhibition into a dramatic text.

When? Thursday 30th January 2020, 15.00 – 16.00

Where? Room CG09 (College building), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

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James Martin Charlton’s new play Reformation was premiered in London in June 2019. Inspired by the life of the German Renaissance painter Lucas Cranach the Elder, the play was conceived after the author visited an exhibition featuring the artist’s work for the Hohenzollern electors. This encounter with Cranach’s portraits and mythological scenes inspired a work which explores themes of sexual exploitation, power and patronage. In this seminar, the author explores how work in the static, two dimensional medium of painting can be reformed into drama, a medium which combines action and dialogue and which progresses through time and three-dimensional space. How does a painter of the 16th century inspire a contemporary dramatist? What uses does a writer make of historical research, and when might it be permissible to speculate and imagine beyond the historical record?

Biography

JMC-2019James Martin Charlton (writer) is a dramatist, director and academic.

His plays include Fat Souls and Coming Up (Warehouse Theatre, Croydon); ecstasy + Grace (Finborough Theatre); Desires of Frankenstein (Open Air, Regents Park/Pleasance, Edinburgh); The World & his Wife, I Really Must be Getting Off (The White Bear); Coward (Just Some Theatre Co.). He has written two short pieces for The Miniaturists, Fellow Creature and Battis Boy (Arcola Theatre). His recent play Been on the Job Too Long has been produced three times since 2015 (at TheatreN16, the North London Literary Festival, and the Talos Festival of Science Fiction Theatre).

He wrote an adaptation of The Pilgrim’s Progress under commission by the RSC, and his biographical play about William Blake, Divine Vision, was performed at Swedenborg Hall.

He has directed a number of contemporary plays, including Gob, Bumps (King’s Head), Plastic Zion (White Bear), Histrionics (Underbelly, Edinburgh). He has directed three site-specific production of plays by James Kenworth: Revolution Farm (after Orwell) played at Newham City Farm in 2014; A Splotch of Red: Keir Hardie in West Ham toured east London libraries and community centres in 2016; Alice in Canning Town was produced at Arc in the Park in summer 2019.

He has written and directed two short films, Apeth (2007) and Academic (2011). He wrote screenplays for the shorts Emotional Tribunal and Best Shot. He recently filmed his play Fellow Creature for 360° video, as part research project into the medium which resulted in the 2019 article ‘VR and the dramatic theatre: are they fellow creatures?’ in the peer-reviewed International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media.

He has lectured at UEL and Birkbeck and is currently Head of Department of Media at Middlesex University.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

The Middlesex Annual Roundtable on Signs, Language and Communication

The Language and Communication research cluster is pleased to announce the Second Roundtable on Signs, Language and Communication that will take place on 7 and 8 January 2020 on the campus of Middlesex University London.

The Middlesex Roundtable on Signs, Language and Communication is an annual workshop launched in January 2019 to encourage discussion between three paradigms of language and communication theory: the integrationism of Roy Harris and his followers, biosemiotics and philosophy of communication. These areas of thought and scholarship share assumptions regarding the fundamental role played by communicative interaction in the emergence of signification, meaning and relationality. They also share views of communication and language that are not limited to the understanding of language as a code-based domain.

The Roundtable is an initiative of Paul Cobley (Professor of Language and Media, Middlesex), Adrian Pablé (Associate Professor, Department of English, Hong Kong University) and Johan Siebers (Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion, Middlesex). It aims to create fruitful interactions between these approaches in an informal context of invited papers, “flipped” conference style (short talks, long conversations) and, each year, a focus on a different topic.

The first Roundtable in 2019 provided participants with the opportunity to discuss basic features of the three approaches. A special issue of Sign Systems Studies based on the papers presented there is in preparation.

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The theme of the second Roundtable will be intersubjectivity. A program and further details about the 2020 Roundtable will be published on London English and our cluster’s website and in due course.

If you have any questions and/or would like to participate, please contact Johan Siebers.

National security as a motivation in language-in-education policy

The Language and Communication Research Cluster is delighted to announce a presentation by Professor Anthony J. Liddicoat (University of Warwick) on national security as a motivation in language-in-education policy.

When? Thursday, 26 March 2020, 15.00-16.00

Where? Room CG09 (College building), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

johan-R2-featForeign language education has often been associated with questions of preserving national security and, when this happens, the inclusion of security as part of the agenda for language education brings particular ideologies into the articulation of policies. One argument found commonly in language policy focused on security is the idea that ensuring security requires that a society as a whole has an understanding and knowledge of those nations or other groups which pose possible security threats and language education is seen as a way to develop such understanding and knowledge. However, what is meant by knowledge and understanding of another can be constructed in different ways.

This presentation will examine both general issues relating to language education policies relating to national security and also specific policy initiatives at particular historical moments during which security has been a key government concern. Both orientations consider language as a barrier for effective national security but construct the solution to such a barrier in different ways. They also construct different expectations around language learners and the ways that language learners are thought to intervene to resolve issues of national security.

 

Research Interests

Picture by www.edwardmoss.co.uk All rights reserved Warwick UniversityProfessor Tony Liddicoat’s research spans a number of areas of applied linguistics including language education, language policy and planning and discourse analysis. Much of his work has focused on the relationship between intercultural understanding and language teaching and learning and the ways that learning a foreign language can promote intercultural capabilities. He is especially interested in understanding how classroom practices that look at the interrelationships between language and culture in the processes of making, communicating and interpreting meanings can enhance language education. He is also interested in how societies and institutions plan language education and what the consequences of this are teachers, students and the society at large.

Biography

Professor Tony Liddicoat’s educational background is in descriptive and applied linguistics and he completed his PhD in Norman French dialects in the Department of French at the University of Melbourne. Since then the focus of his work has mainly been in applied linguistics. Before going to the University of Warwick in 2016, he worked at a number of universities in Australia teaching in both linguistics and applied linguistics. In 1999, he was one of the founding editors of the journal Current Issues in Language Planning, and since 2014 I have been the Executive Editor.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

‘Down an East End Rabbit Hole’: adapting Lewis Carroll for an urban public environment

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE A PRESENTATION BY OUR COLLEAGUE AND acclaimed playwright James Kenworth ON his urban adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland.

When? Thursday 14th November 2019, 15.00 – 16.00

Where? Room CG82 (College), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

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Alice in Canning Town is a brand new contemporary, urban adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, reconfigured for the East End, and performed site-specific in Arc in the Park, an inclusive adventure playground in Canning Town. Alice is the fourth in a quadrilogy of East-End-based plays written by playwright and Middlesex lecturer James Kenworth, all dealing with revolution and social change, and all performed in appropriate locations in the East End. It follows When Chaplin met Gandhi, staged in 2012 at Kingsley Hall, where Gandhi lived and worked for 3 months; Revolution Farm, a ‘hoodie version’ of George Orwell’s Animal Farm, performed in 2014 at Newham City Farm, in the shadows of Canary Wharf; and A Splotch of Red: Keir Hardie in West Ham, documenting the historic victory of Labour’s greatest hero in West Ham, performed in 2016 at Community Links, where Hardie delivered some of his most firebrand speeches.

BIOGRAPHY

imageJames Kenworth is a Playwright and a Lecturer in Media Narrative at Middlesex University. His writing include ‘verse-prose’ plays Johnny Song, Gob; black comedy Polar Bears; issue-led plays Everybody’s World (Elder Abuse)Dementia’s Journey (Dementia); plays for young people/schools The Last Story in the World; and a Newham-based trilogy of site-specific plays, When Chaplin Met Gandhi, Revolution Farm and A Splotch of Red: Keir Hardie in West Ham.

His play, Dementia’s Journey, won the 2015 University of Stirling International Dementia Award in the category: Dementia & the Arts. When Chaplin Met Gandhi and Revolution Farm is published by TSL Publications. A Splotch of Red has recently been published in a collection of political plays by Workable Press, a new publishing imprint dedicated to trade unions and organised workers.

He has extensive experience of planning, preparing and teaching playwriting and creative writing programmes/workshops for a wide variety of age groups and learners including children, young people, students and adult learners. He has worked on a regular basis on the delivery of these programmes with leading arts and educational organisations such as Spread The Word, Cardboard Citizens, Workers Educational Association University, Newham Adult Learning Service, Newham Libraries, Newham College, Community Links, Soho Theatre, University of East London and Middlesex University.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

I Interpret You

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE A PRESENTATION BY OUR COLLEAGUE AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION DR JOHAN SIEBERS ON the role of language in interpersonal encounters in the language philosophies of Donald Davidson and Martin Buber.

When? Thursday 12th December 2019, 15.00 – 16.00

Where? Room G230 (Grove building), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Abstract:

In this talk I will present research done in cooperation with Prof Eli Dresner, Tel Aviv University. We compared the accounts of the role of language in interpersonal encounters in the language philosophies of Donald Davidson and Martin Buber, two thinkers from very different schools thought. The striking parallels as well as the telling differences that emerged allow us to formulate a new perspective on the role played by codes and meaning in communication as well as on basic aspects of the ontology and ethics of communication. Part of this research project was published as “I Intepret You. Davidson and Buber”, in Review of Metaphysics, vol. 73 (1), 2019, 109-126.

 

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Johan Siebers is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at Middlesex University. He is also an Associate Fellow at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, where he leads the Ernst Bloch Centre for German Thought. He has published widely on 19th and 20th century German philosophy, metaphysics, philosophy of communication, rhetoric and futurity. He is founding editor of Empedocles: European Journal for Philosophy of Communication. Before coming to Middlesex he designed and led the first MA in Rhetoric in the UK, at the University of Central Lancashire.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

2019-20 Language & Communication Research Seminars

The Language & Communication research cluster is excited to announce the fantastic line-up of presenters for our 2019-20 research seminars, at our HENDON CAMPUS. The seminars feature world-leading authorities and acclaimed practitioners who discuss their work on language, discourse and communication, literature, creative writing, media and cultural studies. Hope to see you all there!

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  • Dr Johan Siebers: I Interpret You. Thursday 12th December 2019, 15.00-16.00, Room G230 (Grove building).
  • Dr Josie Barnard: The Multimodal Writer. Thursday, 12th March 2020, 15.00-16.00, Room CG09 (College building).

 

 

Check back here for additional listings.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

‘Don’t Mess with Mr. In-Between’: National and Sexual Identities in Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME Dr Yael Maurer (Tel Aviv University) FOR A seminar ON National and Sexual Identities in Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia.

When? Thursday, 10th October 2019, 16.00 – 18.00

Where? Room VG06, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

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In the session, Dr Maurer will be introducing the opening of Kureishi’s novel where he explores the ties between national and sexual identities in the figure of his protagonist, Karim Amir, “an Englishman born and bred, almost” as the famous opening lines of the novel put it. We’ll explore  the notion of an “in-between” state which becomes  central in  the novel’s construction of identity dilemmas, and question how Kureishi presents this option in his novel. The Buddha of Suburbia is a buildunsgroman, a novel about growing up and becoming a man. We’ll see how Kureishi interrogates notions of sexuality, masculinity and nationality in the figure of his youthful protagonist who embodies identity dilemmas  faced by many second generation immigrants in Britain.

 

Biographical Note

Dr. Yael Maurer is Lecturer at the English and American Studies Department at Tel Aviv University, Israel. Her doctoral research focused on “Living on a Broken Mirror: Imitative Modes in Rushdie’s Fiction” (Tel Aviv University, 2009).

Selected publications include:

The Science Fiction Dimensions of Salman Rushdie, McFarland Press (2014).book

Cityscapes of the Future: Urban Spaces in Science Fiction ( Co-Editor),  2018.

“The Body Politic: Philip Roth’s Vision of America”.  The Political Companion to Philip Roth.  Lee Trepanier and Claudia Fanziska Bruhwiller (Editors). University of Kentucky Press (May  2017).

“Undying Histories: Washington Irving’s Gothic Afterlives” Carol Davison (Editor) International Gothic Series, University of Manchester Press( March, 2017).

“Sometimes a Bomb is More than a Blowup; Hitchcock’s’ Sabotage” in Interdisciplinary Humanities: Hitchcock: A Series of Beneficial Shocks. Michael Howarth (Editor). Spring, 2015, Vol. 32.1

The Monstrous Feminine: Reimagining Aliens in American Horror Films”. The Devil You Know: Evil in American Popular Culture. Sharon Packer and Jody Pennington (Editors), Praeger Press. July 2014.

“Not English but Londoners’: Hanif Kureishi’s Sammy and Rosie Get Laid”, The Literary London Journal, Volume 11 Number 1 Spring/Autumn 2014

“Rage Against the Machine: Cyberspace Narratives in Rushdie’s Fury“. The Journal of Commonwealth Literature (47:1). March, 2012

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.