‘Down an East End Rabbit Hole’: adapting Lewis Carroll for an urban public environment

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE A PRESENTATION BY OUR COLLEAGUE AND acclaimed playwright James Kenworth ON his urban adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland.

When? Thursday 14th November 2019, 15.00 – 16.00

Where? Room C131 (College building), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

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Alice in Canning Town is a brand new contemporary, urban adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, reconfigured for the East End, and performed site-specific in Arc in the Park, an inclusive adventure playground in Canning Town. Alice is the fourth in a quadrilogy of East-End-based plays written by playwright and Middlesex lecturer James Kenworth, all dealing with revolution and social change, and all performed in appropriate locations in the East End. It follows When Chaplin met Gandhi, staged in 2012 at Kingsley Hall, where Gandhi lived and worked for 3 months; Revolution Farm, a ‘hoodie version’ of George Orwell’s Animal Farm, performed in 2014 at Newham City Farm, in the shadows of Canary Wharf; and A Splotch of Red: Keir Hardie in West Ham, documenting the historic victory of Labour’s greatest hero in West Ham, performed in 2016 at Community Links, where Hardie delivered some of his most firebrand speeches.

BIOGRAPHY

imageJames Kenworth is a Playwright and a Lecturer in Media Narrative at Middlesex University. His writing include ‘verse-prose’ plays Johnny Song, Gob; black comedy Polar Bears; issue-led plays Everybody’s World (Elder Abuse)Dementia’s Journey (Dementia); plays for young people/schools The Last Story in the World; and a Newham-based trilogy of site-specific plays, When Chaplin Met Gandhi, Revolution Farm and A Splotch of Red: Keir Hardie in West Ham.

His play, Dementia’s Journey, won the 2015 University of Stirling International Dementia Award in the category: Dementia & the Arts. When Chaplin Met Gandhi and Revolution Farm is published by TSL Publications. A Splotch of Red has recently been published in a collection of political plays by Workable Press, a new publishing imprint dedicated to trade unions and organised workers.

He has extensive experience of planning, preparing and teaching playwriting and creative writing programmes/workshops for a wide variety of age groups and learners including children, young people, students and adult learners. He has worked on a regular basis on the delivery of these programmes with leading arts and educational organisations such as Spread The Word, Cardboard Citizens, Workers Educational Association University, Newham Adult Learning Service, Newham Libraries, Newham College, Community Links, Soho Theatre, University of East London and Middlesex University.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

I Interpret You

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE A PRESENTATION BY OUR COLLEAGUE AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION DR JOHAN SIEBERS ON the role of language in interpersonal encounters in the language philosophies of Donald Davidson and Martin Buber.

When? Thursday 12th December 2019, 15.00 – 16.00

Where? Room CG09 (College building), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

Abstract:

In this talk I will present research done in cooperation with Prof Eli Dresner, Tel Aviv University. We compared the accounts of the role of language in interpersonal encounters in the language philosophies of Donald Davidson and Martin Buber, two thinkers from very different schools thought. The striking parallels as well as the telling differences that emerged allow us to formulate a new perspective on the role played by codes and meaning in communication as well as on basic aspects of the ontology and ethics of communication. Part of this research project was published as “I Intepret You. Davidson and Buber”, in Review of Metaphysics, vol. 73 (1), 2019, 109-126.

 

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Johan Siebers is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at Middlesex University. He is also an Associate Fellow at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, where he leads the Ernst Bloch Centre for German Thought. He has published widely on 19th and 20th century German philosophy, metaphysics, philosophy of communication, rhetoric and futurity. He is founding editor of Empedocles: European Journal for Philosophy of Communication. Before coming to Middlesex he designed and led the first MA in Rhetoric in the UK, at the University of Central Lancashire.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

2019-20 Language & Communication Research Seminars

The Language & Communication research cluster is excited to announce the fantastic line-up of presenters for our 2019-20 research seminars, at our HENDON CAMPUS. The seminars feature world-leading authorities and acclaimed practitioners who discuss their work on language, discourse and communication, literature, creative writing, media and cultural studies. Hope to see you all there!

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  • Dr Johan Siebers: I Interpret You. Thursday 12th December 2019, 15.00-16.00, Room CG09 (College building).
  • James Martin Charlton: Paint into text: the re-formation of an exhibition into a dramatic text. Thursday 30th January 2020, 15.00-16.00, Room CG09 (College building).
  • Dr Josie Barnard: The Multimodal Writer. Thursday, 12th March 2020, 15.00-16.00, Room CG09 (College building).

 

Check back here for additional listings.

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

‘Don’t Mess with Mr. In-Between’: National and Sexual Identities in Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia

THE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CLUSTER IS DELIGHTED TO WELCOME Dr Yael Maurer (Tel Aviv University) FOR A seminar ON National and Sexual Identities in Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia.

When? Thursday, 10th October 2019, 16.00 – 18.00

Where? Room VG06, Vine building, Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

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In the session, Dr Maurer will be introducing the opening of Kureishi’s novel where he explores the ties between national and sexual identities in the figure of his protagonist, Karim Amir, “an Englishman born and bred, almost” as the famous opening lines of the novel put it. We’ll explore  the notion of an “in-between” state which becomes  central in  the novel’s construction of identity dilemmas, and question how Kureishi presents this option in his novel. The Buddha of Suburbia is a buildunsgroman, a novel about growing up and becoming a man. We’ll see how Kureishi interrogates notions of sexuality, masculinity and nationality in the figure of his youthful protagonist who embodies identity dilemmas  faced by many second generation immigrants in Britain.

 

Biographical Note

Dr. Yael Maurer is Lecturer at the English and American Studies Department at Tel Aviv University, Israel. Her doctoral research focused on “Living on a Broken Mirror: Imitative Modes in Rushdie’s Fiction” (Tel Aviv University, 2009).

Selected publications include:

The Science Fiction Dimensions of Salman Rushdie, McFarland Press (2014).book

Cityscapes of the Future: Urban Spaces in Science Fiction ( Co-Editor),  2018.

“The Body Politic: Philip Roth’s Vision of America”.  The Political Companion to Philip Roth.  Lee Trepanier and Claudia Fanziska Bruhwiller (Editors). University of Kentucky Press (May  2017).

“Undying Histories: Washington Irving’s Gothic Afterlives” Carol Davison (Editor) International Gothic Series, University of Manchester Press( March, 2017).

“Sometimes a Bomb is More than a Blowup; Hitchcock’s’ Sabotage” in Interdisciplinary Humanities: Hitchcock: A Series of Beneficial Shocks. Michael Howarth (Editor). Spring, 2015, Vol. 32.1

The Monstrous Feminine: Reimagining Aliens in American Horror Films”. The Devil You Know: Evil in American Popular Culture. Sharon Packer and Jody Pennington (Editors), Praeger Press. July 2014.

“Not English but Londoners’: Hanif Kureishi’s Sammy and Rosie Get Laid”, The Literary London Journal, Volume 11 Number 1 Spring/Autumn 2014

“Rage Against the Machine: Cyberspace Narratives in Rushdie’s Fury“. The Journal of Commonwealth Literature (47:1). March, 2012

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2019-20 Language & Communication research seminars.

Reading and distributed perspectives workshop: 8-9 May 2019

This workshop, run by the Language and Communication Research Cluster, is designed to foster further development of the interface of current research into reading, textual analysis, distributed language and associated perspectives.

PROGRAMME

Wednesday, 8 May 2019, in Room CG06

1230 to 1315 Arrival and lunch

1315 to 1330 Introduction – PAUL COBLEY and JOHAN SIEBERS (both Middlesex University)

1330 to 1415 ‘Rereading Whorf: The Aufhebung of linguistic relativity and its implications for textual analysis’ – JOHAN SIEBERS

1415 to 1500 ‘Reading, reality and distributed perspectives’ – PAUL COBLEY

1500 to 1545 ‘Deflating symbols’ – STEPHEN COWLEY (University of Southern Denmark)

1545 to 1615 Tea/Coffee

1615 to 1700 “Reading close in class” – ALAN DURANT (Middlesex University)

1700 to 1745 ‘Shared acts of reading across digital platforms’ – BRONWEN THOMAS (Bournemouth University)
Thursday, 9 May 2019, in Room CG11

1000 to 1045 ‘Wikipedia and the social construction of neutrality’ – STEFAN LUTSCHINGER (Middlesex University)

1045 to 1130 ‘Reading beyond the reader: a multiscale view on reading’ – SARAH BRO TRASMUNDI (University of Southern Denmark)

1130 to 1215 ‘Hearing narratives’ – ADAM LIVELY and TANSY SPINKS (both Middlesex University)

1215 to 1245 Lunch

1245 to 1500 Project discussion

1500 Close

 

For more details, feel free to email Professor Paul Cobley at p.cobley@mdx.ac.uk.

An analysis of the image of women in cosmetic surgery leaflets: visual grammar as a tool to discover stereotypes

We are absolutely delighted to host Professor María Martínez Lirola (University of Alicante) for a seminar on her cutting-edge research on the use of image of women in cosmetic surgery leaflets.

When Tuesday, 19th March 2019, 16.00-18.00

Where? Room PRTCB6B (Portacabin), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

There are many texts in which images of women are used for different purposes in our society. This research explores the main strategies used to create meaning in multimodal texts used by leaflets advertising cosmetic surgery in Alicante (Spain).  The study aims to point out that women are treated as objects in these leaflets. To demonstrate this argument the main visual and linguistic characteristics will be analysed in multimodal texts in which people are persuaded of the benefits of such surgery. Special attention will be paid to the influence that the different linguistic and visual choices may have on society. This study reveals that the image of women that appears in some leaflets of this type is so aggressive that it could be understood as a new form of gender violence.

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lirolaMaría Martínez Lirola is Professor of the Department of English at the University of Alicante, Spain and Research Fellow at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Her main areas of research are Applied Linguistics, Critical Discourse Analysis and Systemic Functional Linguistics. She has published more than 70 papers and seven books, such as Main Processes of Thematization and Postponement in English (Peter Lang, 2009). She has been a visiting scholar in different universities such as: Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo (UASD, 2015), University of Nottingham, Malaysia campus (2015), University of British Columbia and University of Montréal (2014), Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada, 2012), University of South Africa, UNISA (Pretoria, South Africa, 2012), University of Anahuac Mayad (Mérida, Mexico, 2008), University of Kwazulu-Natal (Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, 2006), and Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia, 2005). She has presented papers in international congresses all over the world.

 

This is the full list of all the diverse seminars Professor Lirola will lead during her stay at Middlesex – all part of the Language & Communication Research Seminars series. Everyone is welcome!

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.

Teaching visit of Professor María Martínez Lirola

We are absolutely delighted to host Professor María Martínez Lirola (University of Alicante) for a teaching visit to BA English at Middlesex, between 18th and 22nd of March 2019.

This is a list of the three diverse seminars she will lead at Middlesex University, London- all part of the Language & Communication Research Seminars series. Everyone is welcome!

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AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMAGE OF WOMEN IN COSMETIC SURGERY LEAFLETS: VISUAL GRAMMAR AS A TOOL TO DISCOVER STEREOTYPES. 

Tuesday, 19th March 2019, 16.00-18.00 at room PRTCB6B (Portacabin)

There are many texts in which images of women are used for different purposes in our society. This research explores the main strategies used to create meaning in multimodal texts used by leaflets advertising cosmetic surgery in Alicante (Spain).  The study aims to point out that women are treated as objects in these leaflets. To demonstrate this argument the main visual and linguistic characteristics will be analysed in multimodal texts in which people are persuaded of the benefits of such surgery. Special attention will be paid to the influence that the different linguistic and visual choices may have on society. This study reveals that the image of women that appears in some leaflets of this type is so aggressive that it could be understood as a new form of gender violence.


 

APPROACHING THE REPRESENTATION OF SUB-SAHARAN IMMIGRANTS IN A SAMPLE FROM THE SPANISH PRESS: DECONSTRUCTING STEREOTYPES 

Wednesday, 20th March 2019, 14.30 -16.30, at room V105 (Vine building) 

Spain has become a country receiving immigrants in the last years. The majority of the items of news related to immigration that appear in the press exhibit negative characteristics. The main purpose of this article is to observe the linguistic and visual representation of Sub-Saharan immigrants in a sample of the Spanish press in order to answer the following research questions: how are Sub-Saharan immigrants portrayed linguistically and visually in the given press? What are the implications of the choices in language and images?

The researcher collected all the pieces of news related to Sub-Saharan immigrants in the three most popular Spanish newspapers, i.e., El País, ABC and El Mundo from 1 June 2011 to 31 December 2014. Visual grammar and critical discourse analysis (CDA) will be used in order to deconstruct the visual and linguistic representation of such immigrants. In addition, van Leeuwen’s (2008) classification of social actors will be used in the analysis.

The analysis demonstrates that the representation of Sub-Saharan immigrants displays the following characteristics: they are represented as vulnerable, lacking autonomy, as victims, etc. This representation does not contribute to the fact that the autochthonous population favours the integration of immigrants into the socio-economic structure, exercising the same rights as the Spanish population, and therefore that the dichotomy we-they is emphasized.


HOW CAN WE INTRODUCE CULTURE AND CRITICAL THINKING IN THE CLASSROOM? EXPLORING THE USE OF MULTIMODAL TEXTS IN THE CLASSROOM 

Thursday, 21st March 2019, 17.00-19.00, at room C110 (College building)

The multimodal nature of present societies makes clear that teaching with authentic multimodal texts can contribute to bring different cultural realities into the classroom. In this sense, it was decided to use texts published by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in order to teach visual grammar (Kress and van Leeuwen, 2006) in a master course.

These texts were also selected because they are appropriate to teach cultural aspects, and the reality of poor countries; they also allow the acquisition of interpersonal competences. This paper will point out that teaching students to be critical with the discourse produced by NGOs is essential in order to unveil relationships of domination and power because discourse is always a powerful tool used to reproduce social reality.


Bionote

María Martínez Lirola is Professor of the Department of English at the University of Alicante, Spain and Research Fellow at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Her main areas of research are Applied Linguistics, Critical Discourse Analysis and Systemic Functional Linguistics. She has published more than 70 papers and seven books, such as Main Processes of Thematization and Postponement in English (Peter Lang, 2009). She has been a visiting scholar in different universities such as: Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo (UASD, 2015), University of Nottingham, Malaysia campus (2015), University of British Columbia and University of Montréal (2014), Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada, 2012), University of South Africa, UNISA (Pretoria, South Africa, 2012), University of Anahuac Mayad (Mérida, Mexico, 2008), University of Kwazulu-Natal (Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, 2006), and Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia, 2005). She has presented papers in international congresses all over the world.

 

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.