What our recent graduates have been doing

We wanted to  the content on the BA English course pages, to include specific case studies of students who went on to find jobs or built careers after graduating. I sent an email round to our amazing recent-ish graduates, and these are some of the really inspiring responses I received. From teaching to financial services and speech therapy – our graduates thrive in the widest range of careers.
Tasnim Ahmed – English Teacher

tasnim Ahmed _ english‘I graduated in 2016 and started training to become a  teacher shortly after that. I am currently completing my NQT year as a Teacher of English at Chiltern Academy in Luton. Chiltern Academy is a brand new secondary school in Luton which opened in September 2018. It has been an incredible experience right from the beginning, especially being part of the journey to making our first year at Chiltern a success. I have recently been promoted to the role of Subject Coordinator and look forward to further facilitating and encouraging the learning of English as well as developing our curriculum to ensure all our pupils achieve the best possible outcome. I strongly feel that my degree has enabled me to secure (what I believe) is the best job in the world! Nothing beats the feeling of knowing you are making an impact and inspiring the next generation.’

Check  Chiltern Academy’s Twitter @ChilternA to have a look at what Tasnim’s pupils have been doing in English this year!

 

Amanda Emery – Speech and Language Therapist

‘When I graduate from English at Middlesex, I was lucky enough to get a brilliant job as a Speech and Language Therapy Assistant for the NHS with children with complex needs and children who are deaf. I worked there for one year to gain experience for my Masters application, as the course is extremely competitive and I was fortunate enough to be accepted onto the last NHS funded programme and to become a qualified Speech and Language Therapist.

During my final year on the BA English course I remember not being sure of what I wanted to do and  a tutor mentioned past students career paths had included working as a Speech and Language Therapist  (Which I am very thankful for- as I had never even heard of the profession previously!)

There is a big drive for more diversity in the profession and also to increase awareness of the role to the general public – I would fully recommend becoming a speech and language therapist.’

Name withheld – Banking 

‘During the final year of my degree, I found myself curious about the world of finance but in particular the world of Banking. However considering I was studying a degree in English, I assumed this would be highly unlikely.

Since graduating I worked at Mizuho Bank as a Credit Risk Analyst, then moving on to work at Credit Suisse as a Trade Support Analyst within the Fixed Income Bonds market.’

 

Hiba Hussein – English teacher

‘I went on to do a PGCE and I have now almost finished my second year as a teacher at Haverstock School in Camden (where the Milibands once attended). It is an inner London comprehensive school with a very diverse body of students and staff. I am really enjoying teaching and inspiring young people. I am currently gathering the experience and skills to move on to a more pastoral leadership role in the future i.e. head of year.’

Kvetoslava Drabikova – Accountancy 

KvetoslavaFinally, Kvetoslava Drabikova, who is already on our course page, currently works for Omnicom Media Group, which has recently been recognized as one of the top media agencies in the world by WARC. She is applying the strong communication and project management skills she developed at her English degree at Middlesex in her career in accountancy in London.

 

CALL  FOR PAPERS: The Constructionist View of Communication: Promises and Challenges

We welcome paper for the ECREA Philosophy of Communication Section Workshop, entitled ‘The Constructionist View of Communication: Promises and Challenges’, at the Department of Philosophy, Tel Aviv University, 18-20 September, 2019.

ecrea_smallWhat is communication? There is no single answer to this fundamental question. According to the (still prevailing) transmission view, communication consists in the transfer of messages from sender to receiver. According to the constructionist perspective, on the other hand, in the processes of communication meanings are constituted, not merely transferred. This perspective has many variants (the ritual / constitutive model, use-oriented philosophical outlooks on linguistic meaning, social construction of communication approach, or systems theory – to name only a few), and is pursued (either explicitly or implicitly) by a variety of communication scholars, as well as thinkers in related fields. At the same time, communication constructionism still has its staunch opponents.

The objective of this workshop is to bring together scholars of communication studies, philosophy and neighbouring fields to explore the current faces of constructionism in communication research.

Thus we invite papers concerned with the following questions and topics, among others:

  • Theoretical developments of the constructionist position
  • Formal models of constructionism
  • Critical analyses of constructionism (or its specific variants)
  • Discussions of philosophical/theoretical perspectives on communication that embody the constructionist outlook
  • Applications of the constructionist view in particular case-studies

Please send extended abstracts (up to 400 words) to Eli Dresner, Tel Aviv University, dresner@post.tau.ac.il, by April 7, 2019. Notification of acceptance by May 5, 2019.

For more information, please visit http://philosophyofcommunication.eu

Organizing Committee:

  • Kęstas Kirtiklis, chair (Vilnius University)
  • Eli Dresner (Tel Aviv University)
  • Joana Bicacro (Lusofona University)
  • Mats Bergman (University of Helsinki)
  • Johan Siebers (Middlesex University London)
  • Lydia Sanchez (University of Barcelona)
  • Jose Gomez Pinto (Lusofona University)

 

Dismantling the expectations of women, with Lorna Gibb and Gina Rippon

On a daily basis we face deeply ingrained beliefs that your gender determines your skills and preferences, from toys and colours to career choice and salaries.

On Tuesday 19th March 18:30 our colleague Lorna Gibb participates in a sold-out event at Waterstones London – Gower Street.

In her new book The Gendered BrainGina Rippon draws on her work in cognitive neuroimaging to unpack the stereotypes that bombard us from our earliest moments. Lorna Gibb‘s masterful Childless Voices paints a global portrait of people without children, from the playgrounds of Glasgow to the villages of Bangladesh, a first-of-its-kind, global investigation into an issue that affects millions of people.

Chaired by literary critic Lucy Scholes, Gina and Lorna discussed the expectations put upon women by society and science alike, and unpacked deeply ingrained beliefs about gender, motherhood and sexism from their differing perspectives.

‘Middlesex Echo’ out now

The first issue of The Middlesex Echo arrived on campus on March 16th and is already completely ‘sold out’. The Middlesex Echo is the brand new student newspaper at Middlesex University.

Created and produced by students only, it’s a unique way to hear the voices of Middlesex Students. Natalie Rose, second year BA English student, is the first issue’s editor. The newspaper is full of opinion pieces, feature articles and creative work by BA English and many other Middlesex students.

pow

 

They are on the lookout for new contributors and sub-editors and everyone can get involved.

You can follow them on twitter @mdxecho and on facebook.

 

 

News on Lorna Gibb’s ‘Childless Voices’

Lorna Gibb’s Childless Voices, Stories of Longing, Loss, Resistance and Choice, was published, by Granta, on the 7th February, and was launched in Daunts.  It was really lovely that so many of our final year students came along and their excitement really added hugely to the atmosphere of the occasion.

There have been a few excellent reviews, but the best so far is this in The Guardianhttps://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/feb/06/childless-voices-by-lorna-gibb-review

There was also a great feature in the Times Literary Supplement who invited Lorna to write a piece about it, rather than just have a review, because they liked it so much!  Similarly, the women’s magazine Red asked Lorna to write a piece, after seeing a review copy, which appeared in Feb’s Red Magazine.  There are good few others, too many to list here in fact.

There have also been several Radio interviews, with two more schedules for the near future.  Here’s a podcast of an Irish one: https://www.newstalk.com/podcasts/highlights-from-moncrieff/dr-lorna-gibb-author-of-childless-voice

And Lorna’s BBC interviews are available on the Radio iplayer.  The foreign rights will go to auction in the late spring and two filmmakers have already showed interest in broadcast rights.

Lorna is currently signed up as a guest speaker at six festivals across the country, and there will be a lot more!

If anyone thinks the book might interest them, it’s available at all bookstores, but is slightly cheaper in WH Smiths online and Foyles at present.

North London Story Festival 2019 – Booking Open

You are invited to this year’s North London Story Festival, featuring an exciting programme of talks, debates and a special screening of  Generation Revolution followed by a Q&A, pizza, drinks and panel discussion.

cropped-logo-nlsfEvery year the Media Department hosts this all-day event celebrating all forms of storytelling, whether for screen, stage or page.

Where and when? Thursday 21st February 2019, 11am onwards with main events taking place in C219, College Building.

This year’s theme is My Generation, dedicated to stories and narratives about what it means to be young and living in the UK today.

Book tickets, and find out more at: http://northlondonstoryfestival.co.uk

Our fantastic line-up of speakers include:

  • Vas Blackwood, of Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels fame, whose 30 year career spans film and TV, and work with The Black Theatre Co-Op, the National Theatre, Young Vic and RSC. Tickets here.
  • Benjamin ‘Ben’ Zand, a British-Iranian journalist and filmmaker for the BBC and Royal Television Society Journalism Awards winner. Recent documentaries include ‘R:Kelly: Sex, Lies, and Videotape’ and ‘Searching for Kanye’. Tickets here.
  • Alex di Cuffa (Black Cat Theatre, Raindance) will give a first-hand account of surviving in film, TV and theatre. Tickets here.

Come hear about ‘Decolonising the University’ by Dalia Gebriel and ‘Making Media’ for industry  professionals by Mark Deuze.

Don’t miss the Google News Lab workshop, run by journalist Abigail Edge (BBC, The Guardian).

The day will end with a screening of Generation Revolution (2016), about London’s new generation of black and brown activists changing the capital and beyond. Check out the filmmaker’s Q&A, followed by pizza, drinks, and what promises to be a lively ‘My Generation’ debate featuring students from Media Foundation and BA English and staff from Media and Theatre Arts. Come and have your say!

Free: open to students, faculty and members of the public. You are welcome to bring friends and family.

 

An analysis of the image of women in cosmetic surgery leaflets: visual grammar as a tool to discover stereotypes

We are absolutely delighted to host Professor María Martínez Lirola (University of Alicante) for a seminar on her cutting-edge research on the use of image of women in cosmetic surgery leaflets.

When Tuesday, 19th March 2019, 16.00-18.00

Where? Room PRTCB6B (Portacabin), Middlesex University, London, NW4 4BT

There are many texts in which images of women are used for different purposes in our society. This research explores the main strategies used to create meaning in multimodal texts used by leaflets advertising cosmetic surgery in Alicante (Spain).  The study aims to point out that women are treated as objects in these leaflets. To demonstrate this argument the main visual and linguistic characteristics will be analysed in multimodal texts in which people are persuaded of the benefits of such surgery. Special attention will be paid to the influence that the different linguistic and visual choices may have on society. This study reveals that the image of women that appears in some leaflets of this type is so aggressive that it could be understood as a new form of gender violence.

Bionote

lirolaMaría Martínez Lirola is Professor of the Department of English at the University of Alicante, Spain and Research Fellow at the University of South Africa (UNISA). Her main areas of research are Applied Linguistics, Critical Discourse Analysis and Systemic Functional Linguistics. She has published more than 70 papers and seven books, such as Main Processes of Thematization and Postponement in English (Peter Lang, 2009). She has been a visiting scholar in different universities such as: Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo (UASD, 2015), University of Nottingham, Malaysia campus (2015), University of British Columbia and University of Montréal (2014), Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada, 2012), University of South Africa, UNISA (Pretoria, South Africa, 2012), University of Anahuac Mayad (Mérida, Mexico, 2008), University of Kwazulu-Natal (Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, 2006), and Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia, 2005). She has presented papers in international congresses all over the world.

 

This is the full list of all the diverse seminars Professor Lirola will lead during her stay at Middlesex – all part of the Language & Communication Research Seminars series. Everyone is welcome!

The Language and Communication Research Seminars are free and open to all staff, students and guests. For any questions or if you would like to lead a session, contact Anna Charalambidou.

Click here to see all 2018-19 Language & Communication research seminars.