Sneak peak on this year’s ‘Haringey Unchained’ magazine

We are very happy to report that all content (poems, short fiction, illustrations, photographs etc.) that we have submitted this year has  been added to the Haringey Unchained blog.

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Please visit here: https://haringeyunchained.wordpress.com.

 

At the top of the page, there is the following link, which reflects the partnership between students and staff of English from Middlesex University and Haringey Sixth Form Centre:

https://haringeyunchained.wordpress.com/university-partnerships/

Submission on the blog are anonymised. Anything submitted by Middlesex is demarcated by a * in the title.

Over the next couple weeks, we’ll be updating the blog so that it is a premium account so the URL will eventually change to: www.haringeyunchained.com.

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Our next and final editorial session together will be Thursday 3rd May at 4:30 pm. We are going to have to be merciless about the items we cut in order to get it to fit 52 pages.  We will spent the time placing pieces along the flat plan together.

Really looking forward to seeing the finalised version of the print magazine!

Studying Instagram Beyond Selfies: Instagram Conference 2018, 01 June 2018, Middlesex University

With as many “users as Twitter (310 million), Snapchat (100-million-plus) and Pinterest (100 million) combined” (Forbes 2016), Instagram has become one of the most important social networking sites globally and in the process has transformed the role of photographs and photography in visual culture. Designed to exploit the affordances of mobile media (Carah 2015) and the immediate and intuitive logic of visual communication, Instagram is notably popular among young people (18-29 years old) (WordStream 2017).

instaThe phenomenal success of Instagram has not gone unnoticed by brands and micro-celebrities that increased their investments and activities on the platform – (according to Forbes the current financial value of Instagram stays somewhere between $25 billion and $50 billion (Forbers 2016)).

Despite all these, there is a scarcity of empirical research conducted through Instagram, especially beyond the use of selfies.

Call for papers:

You are invited to submit proposals for a single paper or a pre-constituted panel around a particular theme. Individual abstracts should be 350 words or 500 for a full panel proposal. Please also include a short bio of no more than 100 words per participant. Please submit to Alessandro Caliandro, email A.Caliandro@mdx.ac.uk  by 30 April 2018.

Registration will open soon after the 30th of April. Registration fee: £30 (for undergraduate students), £50 (for academics/practitioners).

For more information, including possible questions to address, and keynote speakers, see: http://instagramconf.mdx.me.uk/

Keynote Speakers:

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Richard Rogers, Professor of New Media & Digital Culture, Media Studies, University of Amsterdam.

Keynote Address: Otherwise engaged: Social Media from vanity metrics to critical analytics

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Dr Crystal Abidin, socio-cultural anthropologist of vernacular internet cultures

Keynote Address: Tap that, Hack that, Map that: Economies, Cultures, and Materialites of Instagram

Footage of conversation with Ian McGuire

Last month, Ian McGuire, author of the celebrated novel, The North Water, visited Middlesex to answer questions from BA English students. The event was sold out and a great success. If you missed it, or would like to watch it again, here’s the footage of the discussion.

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All English events at Middlesex this week

This is the busiest and most exciting week of the year in our English events calendar. We are hosting the final Language & Communication research seminar of this series, we are welcoming two Erasmus teaching visits in English, and Creative Writing & Journalism students are running this year’s Story Festival. Here’s a reminder of all events on campus this week. We hope you’ll join us in as many as you can:

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Tuesday, 13th March

  • 12.00-14.00 Metafiction in Postmodern American Literature and Popular Culture by Dr Aleksandra Vukotić (University of Belgrade), BG09B (Building 9)
  • 14.00-16.00: Trauma, Cultural Memory, and Identity in Sebastian Barry’s ‘A Long Long Way’ by Professor Ksenija Kondali (University of Sarajevo), C136 (College Building) – Open lecture

11.00-20.00 North London Story Festival (various rooms)

 

 

Wednesday, 14th March

12.00-14.00 Intertextuality in Jeanette Winterson’s ‘The Gap of Time’. By Dr Aleksandra Vukotić, CG48 (College Building)

16.00-17.30 The Embodied Nature of Narrative: Moving with purpose with others, and its disruption in autism. By Dr Jonathan Delafield-Butt (University of Strathclyde),  New room: BG02 (Building 9) Final Language & Communication Research Seminar for this year!

 

Thursday, 15th March

15.00 -17.00 Negotiating the Technological Sublime: DeLillo’s and Antonioni’s

Murder Mysteries. By Dr Aleksandra Vukotić, CG43 (College building) – Open lecture

 

ksenFriday, 16th  March

10.00-12.00 Whoever controls your eyeballs runs the world : A “Paranoid” Reading of Media. By Dr Aleksandra Vukotić, CG09 (College building)

15.00-17.00 Fictionalizing Transatlantic Slavery: A Comparative Study. By Professor Ksenija Kondali (University of Sarajevo), PAG02 (Portacabin)

 

All welcome!

For directions to Middlesex University Hendon campus, click here.

Dr Ksenija Kondali, University of Sarajevo, coming to Middlesex for an Erasmus+ teaching visit to talk about Fictionalizing Transatlantic Slavery

We are delighted to welcome Dr Ksenija Kondali, assistant professor at the University of Sarajevo (Faculty of Philosophy) for an Erasmus+ teaching visit on March 16th, 2018. She will give an interactive seminar on Fictionalizing Transatlantic Slavery: A Comparative Study.

When? Friday March 16th, 15.00 – 17.00

Where? PAG02 (Portacabin)

Building on the theorizations of the Black Atlantic paradigm developed by Paul Gilroy (1993) and its “re-membering” by Lars Eckstein (2006), and other theoretical foundations, this presentation investigates the re-inscription of transatlantic slavery in selected literary texts from a comparative perspective. More specifically, it addresses the recuperation of disregarded voices from the Middle Passage and the transatlantic linkage of black identities. These voices are heard in the novel A Mercy (2008) by the African-American author Toni Morrison, the British-Guyanese author Fred D’Aguiar’s The Longest Memory (1994), and The Book of Negroes (2007) by Lawrence Hill, a Canadian author of US-immigrant parentage. Comparing particular features of “traumatic pasts, literary afterlives” (Erll 2011) and embedded traumatic memories represented in these texts, this talk focuses on the different representations of memory in the novels, set in various historical, geographical and cultural landscapes.

ksenjaKsenija Kondali is an assistant professor and teaches courses on US history, literary theory, British and American literature and culture at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Sarajevo. She completed her BA and MA at the University of Sarajevo, and defended her doctoral dissertation in English at the University of Zagreb (Croatia). Dr Kondali has presented her papers at over twenty regional and international conferences and published papers about American, British, Irish, and postcolonial authors.

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In 2016, she co-edited a volume entitled Critical and Comparative Perspectives on American Studies (published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing), and last year she published her monograph Intersecting Paradigms, about history, memory, and space in contemporary American women’s writing.

 

All welcome – no need to register.

 

For an outline of all Language & Communication events the week commencing March 12th 2018, please click here.

Week of events hosted by the Language & Communication Research cluster

The week commencing 12th March will be the busiest week yet for our cluster; we have the final Language & Communication research seminar for this term:

The Embodied Nature of Narrative: Moving with purpose with others, and its disruption in autism

Dr Jonathan Delafield-Butt, Reader in Child Development (University of Strathclyde)

Wednesday 14 March 2018, 16.00 – 17.30, Room BG02 (Building 9) – note room change

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We are welcoming two Erasmus visiting professors who will give a number of exciting seminars.

Dr Aleksandra Vukotic (Assistant Professor, University of Belgrade), Erasmus+ visiting professor will give three transdisciplinary interactive seminars and an Open Lecture in the domain of literary, media, cultural, and film studies:

1. Metafiction in Postmodern American Literature and Popular Culture: Tuesday, 13 March, 12.00-14.00 at room BG09B (Building 9)

2. Intertextuality in Jeanette Winterson’s ‘The Gap of Time’: Wednesday, March 14, 12.00-14.00, room CG48 (College Building)

3. Negotiating the Technological Sublime: DeLillo’s and Antonioni’s Murder Mysteries: Thursday 15th March, 15.00-17.00, room CG43 (College building)

4. Whoever controls your eyeballs runs the world : A “Paranoid” Reading of MediaFriday 16th March, 10.00-12.00 at room CG09 (College building).

***

Professor Ksenijah Kondali (Assistant Professor, University of Sarajevo), Erasmus+ visiting professor will give a seminar entitled Fictionalizing Transatlantic Slavery: A Comparative StudyFriday March 16th, 15.00 – 17.00 at PAG02 (Portacabin).

***

You are welcome to attend any or all seminars  – no prior knowledge needed.

And of course, in addition to all these, Creative Writing & Journalism students are organizing a whole-day North London Story Festival (March 13th).

 

“No one talks like that. Sorry”: video-recording of Jane Hodson’s presentation

A couple of weeks ago the Language and Communication Research cluster welcomed distinguished linguist and literary scholar Professor Jane Hodson (University of Sheffield) for a presentation on what people are doing when they discuss the representation of accents in film and television.

Here’s a one-minute teaser of Jane’s fascinating talk.

And here’s the entire presentation!

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The lighting is not fantastic. Sorry. But the presentation well worth watching.

Happy watching!